Group B streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with bacteremia

Malliga E. Ganapathy, J. Peter Rissing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Group B streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis is rare in adults. Osteomyelitis due to this organism is in general related to contiguous infections, recent surgery, or peripheral vascular disease. All reported cases of group B streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis, however, have had no association with these predisposing factors and have usually been presumed to be of hematogenous origin, though bacteremia has never been demonstrated. Here we describe a 45-year-old intravenous drug abuser who had vertebral osteomyelitis and bacteremia. We conclude that the vertebral osteomyelitis in this patient was hematogenous, as shown by bacteremia, and most likely resulted from intravenous needle use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)350-351
Number of pages2
JournalSouthern Medical Journal
Volume88
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

Osteomyelitis
Bacteremia
Peripheral Vascular Diseases
Drug Users
Causality
Needles
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Group B streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with bacteremia. / Ganapathy, Malliga E.; Peter Rissing, J.

In: Southern Medical Journal, Vol. 88, No. 3, 01.01.1995, p. 350-351.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{639ab5adec984fc4a7ed7f8cead6a188,
title = "Group B streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with bacteremia",
abstract = "Group B streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis is rare in adults. Osteomyelitis due to this organism is in general related to contiguous infections, recent surgery, or peripheral vascular disease. All reported cases of group B streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis, however, have had no association with these predisposing factors and have usually been presumed to be of hematogenous origin, though bacteremia has never been demonstrated. Here we describe a 45-year-old intravenous drug abuser who had vertebral osteomyelitis and bacteremia. We conclude that the vertebral osteomyelitis in this patient was hematogenous, as shown by bacteremia, and most likely resulted from intravenous needle use.",
author = "Ganapathy, {Malliga E.} and {Peter Rissing}, J.",
year = "1995",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00007611-199503000-00020",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "88",
pages = "350--351",
journal = "Southern Medical Journal",
issn = "0038-4348",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Group B streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with bacteremia

AU - Ganapathy, Malliga E.

AU - Peter Rissing, J.

PY - 1995/1/1

Y1 - 1995/1/1

N2 - Group B streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis is rare in adults. Osteomyelitis due to this organism is in general related to contiguous infections, recent surgery, or peripheral vascular disease. All reported cases of group B streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis, however, have had no association with these predisposing factors and have usually been presumed to be of hematogenous origin, though bacteremia has never been demonstrated. Here we describe a 45-year-old intravenous drug abuser who had vertebral osteomyelitis and bacteremia. We conclude that the vertebral osteomyelitis in this patient was hematogenous, as shown by bacteremia, and most likely resulted from intravenous needle use.

AB - Group B streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis is rare in adults. Osteomyelitis due to this organism is in general related to contiguous infections, recent surgery, or peripheral vascular disease. All reported cases of group B streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis, however, have had no association with these predisposing factors and have usually been presumed to be of hematogenous origin, though bacteremia has never been demonstrated. Here we describe a 45-year-old intravenous drug abuser who had vertebral osteomyelitis and bacteremia. We conclude that the vertebral osteomyelitis in this patient was hematogenous, as shown by bacteremia, and most likely resulted from intravenous needle use.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028941039&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028941039&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00007611-199503000-00020

DO - 10.1097/00007611-199503000-00020

M3 - Article

C2 - 7886535

AN - SCOPUS:0028941039

VL - 88

SP - 350

EP - 351

JO - Southern Medical Journal

JF - Southern Medical Journal

SN - 0038-4348

IS - 3

ER -