Hepatic and renal trace element concentrations in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) following chronic dietary exposure to coal fly ash contaminated prey

Tracey D. Tuberville, David E. Scott, Brian S. Metts, John W. Finger, Matthew T. Hamilton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Little is known about the propensity of crocodilians to bioaccumulate trace elements as a result of chronic dietary exposure. We exposed 36 juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) to one of four dietary treatments that varied in the relative frequency of meals containing prey from coal combustion waste (CCW)-contaminated habitats vs. prey from uncontaminated sites, and evaluated tissue residues and growth rates after 12 mo and 25 mo of exposure. Hepatic and renal concentrations of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and selenium (Se) varied significantly among dietary treatment groups in a dose-dependent manner and were higher in kidneys than in livers. Exposure period did not affect Se or As levels but Cd levels were significantly higher after 25 mo than 12 mo of exposure. Kidney As and Se levels were negatively correlated with body size but neither growth rates nor body condition varied significantly among dietary treatment groups. Our study is among the first to experimentally examine bioaccumulation of trace element contaminants in crocodilians as a result of chronic dietary exposure. A combination of field surveys and laboratory experiments will be required to understand the effects of different exposure scenarios on tissue residues, and ultimately link these concentrations with effects on individual health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)680-689
Number of pages10
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume214
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

Coal Ash
Alligators and Crocodiles
Coal
Selenium
Trace Elements
Arsenic
Trace elements
Fly ash
Cadmium
Kidney
Liver
Tissue
Bioaccumulation
Coal combustion
Body Size
Growth
Ecosystem
Meals
Health
Impurities

Keywords

  • Bioaccumulation
  • Chronic dietary exposure
  • Coal combustion waste
  • Crocodilian
  • Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Hepatic and renal trace element concentrations in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) following chronic dietary exposure to coal fly ash contaminated prey. / Tuberville, Tracey D.; Scott, David E.; Metts, Brian S.; Finger, John W.; Hamilton, Matthew T.

In: Environmental Pollution, Vol. 214, 01.07.2016, p. 680-689.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tuberville, Tracey D. ; Scott, David E. ; Metts, Brian S. ; Finger, John W. ; Hamilton, Matthew T. / Hepatic and renal trace element concentrations in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) following chronic dietary exposure to coal fly ash contaminated prey. In: Environmental Pollution. 2016 ; Vol. 214. pp. 680-689.
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