How I investigate Eosinophilia

Rebecca L. Larsen, Natasha Marie Savage

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Eosinophilia is typically secondary, that is, reactive, in nature and is associated with a wide variety of neoplastic and non-neoplastic disorders. Clonal eosinophilia is also seen in a wide variety of hematopoietic neoplasms, and sub-classification can be diagnostically challenging. A proper evaluation of persistent eosinophilia involves correlation of clinical history, laboratory data, cellular morphology, and ancillary testing. Knowledge of appropriate ancillary testing is necessary for a timely diagnosis. We present a review of the literature regarding eosinophilia, including the 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) update of WHO-defined eosinophilic disorders. We also present a review of eosinophilia in a case-based format including guidelines for evaluation of both routine and challenging cases. The purpose of this guideline is not to provide an in-depth discussion of each diagnosis, but rather a practical method that all pathologists can utilize to investigate eosinophilia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-161
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Laboratory Hematology
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

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Keywords

  • blood
  • bone marrow
  • eosinophils
  • leukemia
  • morphology
  • myeloid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

How I investigate Eosinophilia. / Larsen, Rebecca L.; Savage, Natasha Marie.

In: International Journal of Laboratory Hematology, Vol. 41, No. 2, 01.04.2019, p. 153-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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