Impact of mentoring relationships on nursing professional socialization

Shena Borders Gazaway, Robert W. Gibson, Autumn Schumacher, Lori Schumacher Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: This study qualitatively explored the impact mentoring relationships had on the professional socialization of novice clinical nurse leader. Background: Professional socialization entails acquisition of the skills, knowledge and values associated with nursing. Model C clinical nurse leaders have completed a bachelor's degree before graduate-level nursing programme acceptance. Thereby, the mentoring needs of model C clinical nurse leaders may differ from that of traditionally educated novice nurses. Method: Focus groups were conducted with seven novice model C clinical nurse leaders during their first year of employment. Qualitative data were analysed via a grounded theory approach. Results: The participants described an intense focus on patient care and how multiple mentoring relationships motivated them to become competent bedside clinicians. They described how the mentors’ actions enabled them to deal with negative feelings, which increased their confidence, comfort and competence with clinical skills. Conclusions: Clinical skills improved when a novice model C clinical nurse leader worked with multiple mentors. The qualitative data did not show that the model C clinical nurse leaders needed different mentoring relationships than traditionally educated nurses. Implication for Nursing Management: The results suggest multiple mentors should be used to develop the clinical competences of novice model C clinical nurse leaders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Nursing Management
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Socialization
Nursing
Nurses
Mentors
Clinical Competence
Mentoring
Focus Groups
Mental Competency
Patient Care
Emotions

Keywords

  • clinical nurse leader
  • mentoring relationship
  • newly licensed registered nurse
  • nursing professional socialization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management

Cite this

Impact of mentoring relationships on nursing professional socialization. / Gazaway, Shena Borders; Gibson, Robert W.; Schumacher, Autumn; Anderson, Lori Schumacher.

In: Journal of Nursing Management, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gazaway, Shena Borders ; Gibson, Robert W. ; Schumacher, Autumn ; Anderson, Lori Schumacher. / Impact of mentoring relationships on nursing professional socialization. In: Journal of Nursing Management. 2019.
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