In vitro model for evaluating the effect of child formula toothpastes on artificial caries in primary dentition enamel

Puckpring Thaveesangpanich, Anut Itthagarun, Nigel M. King, James S. Wefel, Franklin R. Tay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To determine if the in vitro 10-day pH-cycling model used for permanent teeth could be utilized to evaluate de/remineralization effects, on the enamel of primary teeth, of child formula toothpastes. Methods: Sound extracted primary anterior teeth were coated with nail varnish, leaving a 1 mm-wide window prior to being placed in a demineralizing solution to produce artificial carious lesions in enamel. The teeth were subsequently cut longitudinally into 100 μm thick sections. The 72 specimens were randomly assigned to six groups. In Set 1 contained the specimens in Group a, which were treated with a pea-sized (0.32 g) quantity of non-fluoride toothpaste (First Teeth), and Groups b and c which were treated with half and pea-sized (0.16 g) quantities of fluoridated toothpaste (Colgate), and cycled for 10 days. The specimens in Set 2 (Groups A, B and C) were similarly treated but subjected to 7-day pH-cycling. Results: After Day 8 the lesions in Set 1 extended into dentin and so could not be evaluated. Polarized light microscopy and microradiography were used to evaluate the lesions subjected to 7-day pH-cycling. Lesions in Groups A and B increased in depth and area by approximately 50%, while those in Group C increased in depth and area by 20%; however, no statistically significant differences occurred between the groups. If this model pH cycling is to be used for primary teeth, a reduction from 10 to 7 days in length should be considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)212-216
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of dentistry
Volume18
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Toothpastes
Deciduous Tooth
Dental Enamel
Tooth
Peas
Microradiography
Polarization Microscopy
Paint
Dentin
Nails
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

In vitro model for evaluating the effect of child formula toothpastes on artificial caries in primary dentition enamel. / Thaveesangpanich, Puckpring; Itthagarun, Anut; King, Nigel M.; Wefel, James S.; Tay, Franklin R.

In: American journal of dentistry, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.06.2005, p. 212-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thaveesangpanich, Puckpring ; Itthagarun, Anut ; King, Nigel M. ; Wefel, James S. ; Tay, Franklin R. / In vitro model for evaluating the effect of child formula toothpastes on artificial caries in primary dentition enamel. In: American journal of dentistry. 2005 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 212-216.
@article{cf9c895f55ca42bc8c57162848745d99,
title = "In vitro model for evaluating the effect of child formula toothpastes on artificial caries in primary dentition enamel",
abstract = "Purpose: To determine if the in vitro 10-day pH-cycling model used for permanent teeth could be utilized to evaluate de/remineralization effects, on the enamel of primary teeth, of child formula toothpastes. Methods: Sound extracted primary anterior teeth were coated with nail varnish, leaving a 1 mm-wide window prior to being placed in a demineralizing solution to produce artificial carious lesions in enamel. The teeth were subsequently cut longitudinally into 100 μm thick sections. The 72 specimens were randomly assigned to six groups. In Set 1 contained the specimens in Group a, which were treated with a pea-sized (0.32 g) quantity of non-fluoride toothpaste (First Teeth), and Groups b and c which were treated with half and pea-sized (0.16 g) quantities of fluoridated toothpaste (Colgate), and cycled for 10 days. The specimens in Set 2 (Groups A, B and C) were similarly treated but subjected to 7-day pH-cycling. Results: After Day 8 the lesions in Set 1 extended into dentin and so could not be evaluated. Polarized light microscopy and microradiography were used to evaluate the lesions subjected to 7-day pH-cycling. Lesions in Groups A and B increased in depth and area by approximately 50{\%}, while those in Group C increased in depth and area by 20{\%}; however, no statistically significant differences occurred between the groups. If this model pH cycling is to be used for primary teeth, a reduction from 10 to 7 days in length should be considered.",
author = "Puckpring Thaveesangpanich and Anut Itthagarun and King, {Nigel M.} and Wefel, {James S.} and Tay, {Franklin R.}",
year = "2005",
month = "6",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "212--216",
journal = "American Journal of Dentistry",
issn = "0894-8275",
publisher = "Mosher and Linder, Inc",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - In vitro model for evaluating the effect of child formula toothpastes on artificial caries in primary dentition enamel

AU - Thaveesangpanich, Puckpring

AU - Itthagarun, Anut

AU - King, Nigel M.

AU - Wefel, James S.

AU - Tay, Franklin R.

PY - 2005/6/1

Y1 - 2005/6/1

N2 - Purpose: To determine if the in vitro 10-day pH-cycling model used for permanent teeth could be utilized to evaluate de/remineralization effects, on the enamel of primary teeth, of child formula toothpastes. Methods: Sound extracted primary anterior teeth were coated with nail varnish, leaving a 1 mm-wide window prior to being placed in a demineralizing solution to produce artificial carious lesions in enamel. The teeth were subsequently cut longitudinally into 100 μm thick sections. The 72 specimens were randomly assigned to six groups. In Set 1 contained the specimens in Group a, which were treated with a pea-sized (0.32 g) quantity of non-fluoride toothpaste (First Teeth), and Groups b and c which were treated with half and pea-sized (0.16 g) quantities of fluoridated toothpaste (Colgate), and cycled for 10 days. The specimens in Set 2 (Groups A, B and C) were similarly treated but subjected to 7-day pH-cycling. Results: After Day 8 the lesions in Set 1 extended into dentin and so could not be evaluated. Polarized light microscopy and microradiography were used to evaluate the lesions subjected to 7-day pH-cycling. Lesions in Groups A and B increased in depth and area by approximately 50%, while those in Group C increased in depth and area by 20%; however, no statistically significant differences occurred between the groups. If this model pH cycling is to be used for primary teeth, a reduction from 10 to 7 days in length should be considered.

AB - Purpose: To determine if the in vitro 10-day pH-cycling model used for permanent teeth could be utilized to evaluate de/remineralization effects, on the enamel of primary teeth, of child formula toothpastes. Methods: Sound extracted primary anterior teeth were coated with nail varnish, leaving a 1 mm-wide window prior to being placed in a demineralizing solution to produce artificial carious lesions in enamel. The teeth were subsequently cut longitudinally into 100 μm thick sections. The 72 specimens were randomly assigned to six groups. In Set 1 contained the specimens in Group a, which were treated with a pea-sized (0.32 g) quantity of non-fluoride toothpaste (First Teeth), and Groups b and c which were treated with half and pea-sized (0.16 g) quantities of fluoridated toothpaste (Colgate), and cycled for 10 days. The specimens in Set 2 (Groups A, B and C) were similarly treated but subjected to 7-day pH-cycling. Results: After Day 8 the lesions in Set 1 extended into dentin and so could not be evaluated. Polarized light microscopy and microradiography were used to evaluate the lesions subjected to 7-day pH-cycling. Lesions in Groups A and B increased in depth and area by approximately 50%, while those in Group C increased in depth and area by 20%; however, no statistically significant differences occurred between the groups. If this model pH cycling is to be used for primary teeth, a reduction from 10 to 7 days in length should be considered.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=23744497302&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=23744497302&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 16158814

AN - SCOPUS:23744497302

VL - 18

SP - 212

EP - 216

JO - American Journal of Dentistry

JF - American Journal of Dentistry

SN - 0894-8275

IS - 3

ER -