Intracranial self-stimulation to evaluate abuse potential of drugs

S. Stevens Negus, Laurence L. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

90 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) is a behavioral procedure in which operant responding is maintained by pulses of electrical brain stimulation. In research to study abuse-related drug effects, ICSS relies on electrode placements that target the medial forebrain bundle at the level of the lateral hypothalamus, and experimental sessions manipulate frequency or amplitude of stimulation to engender a wide range of baseline response rates or response probabilities. Under these conditions, drug-induced increases in low rates/probabilities of responding maintained by low frequencies/amplitudes of stimulation are interpreted as an abuse-related effect. Conversely, drug-induced decreases in high rates/probabilities of responding maintained by high frequencies/amplitudes of stimulation can be interpreted as an abuse-limiting effect. Overall abuse potential can be inferred from the relative expression of abuse-related and abuse-limiting effects. The sensitivity and selectivity of ICSS to detect abuse potential of many classes of abused drugs is similar to the sensitivity and selectivity of drug self-administration procedures. Moreover, similar to progressive-ratio drug selfadministration procedures, ICSS data can be used to rank the relative abuse potential of different drugs. Strengths of ICSS in comparison with drug selfadministration include 1) potential for simultaneous evaluation of both abuse-related and abuse-limiting effects, 2) flexibility for use with various routes of drug administration or drug vehicles, 3) utility for studies in drug-naive subjects as well as in subjects with controlled levels of prior drug exposure, and 4) utility for studies of drug time course. Taken together, these considerations suggest that ICSS can make significant contributions to the practice of abuse potential testing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)869-917
Number of pages49
JournalPharmacological Reviews
Volume66
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014

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Self Stimulation
Substance-Related Disorders
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Drug Administration Routes
Lateral Hypothalamic Area
Medial Forebrain Bundle
Deep Brain Stimulation
Self Administration
Electrodes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Intracranial self-stimulation to evaluate abuse potential of drugs. / Stevens Negus, S.; Miller, Laurence L.

In: Pharmacological Reviews, Vol. 66, No. 3, 07.2014, p. 869-917.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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