iPad experience during clinical rotations from seven medical schools in the United States: Lessons learned

Kalie Deutsch, Julie K Gaines, Janette R. Hill, Michelle Ann Nuss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Since 2010, many US medical schools have introduced the use of mobile technology into their curriculum. Preclinical use of mobile technologies has been well studied, but use in the clinical years has been less explored. Our objective was to identify the clinical uses and limitations of mobile technology in the clinical curriculum. Methods: Interviews were conducted with key personnel at seven U. S. medical schools who introduced iPad programs during the clinical years. Interviews were qualitatively analyzed using a constant comparison technique. Results and recommendations: Eight “best practices” for introducing mobile technology in the clinical years were identified: (1) plan before implementation, (2) define focused goals, (3) establish a tablet “culture,” (4) recruit appropriate implementation team, (5) invest in training, (6) involve students in mentoring, (7) accept variable use, and (8) encourage innovation. Conclusions: There is growing interest in using mobile technology for teaching and learning in the clinical curriculum. Following the identified best practices may assist schools with the integration of the technology into the curriculum and better prepare medical students to handle the increasing use of technology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1152-1156
Number of pages5
JournalMedical Teacher
Volume38
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

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iPad experience during clinical rotations from seven medical schools in the United States : Lessons learned. / Deutsch, Kalie; Gaines, Julie K; Hill, Janette R.; Nuss, Michelle Ann.

In: Medical Teacher, Vol. 38, No. 11, 01.11.2016, p. 1152-1156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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