It's a lipid's world: Bioactive lipid metabolism and signaling in neural stem cell differentiation

Erhard Bieberich

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lipids are often considered membrane components whose function is to embed proteins into cell membranes. In the last two decades, studies on brain lipids have unequivocally demonstrated that many lipids have critical cell signaling functions; they are called "bioactive lipids". Pioneering work in Dr. Robert Ledeen's laboratory has shown that two bioactive brain sphingolipids, sphingomyelin and the ganglioside GM1 are major signaling lipids in the nuclear envelope. In addition to derivatives of the sphingolipid ceramide, the bioactive lipids discussed here belong to the classes of terpenoids and steroids, eicosanoids, and lysophospholipids. These lipids act mainly through two mechanisms: (1) direct interaction between the bioactive lipid and a specific protein binding partner such as a lipid receptor, protein kinase or phosphatase, ion exchanger, or other cell signaling protein; and (2) formation of lipid microdomains or rafts that regulate the activity of a group of raft-associated cell signaling proteins. In recent years, a third mechanism has emerged, which invokes lipid second messengers as a regulator for the energy and redox balance of differentiating neural stem cells (NSCs). Interestingly, developmental niches such as the stem cell niche for adult NSC differentiation may also be metabolic compartments that respond to a distinct combination of bioactive lipids. The biological function of these lipids as regulators of NSC differentiation will be reviewed and their application in stem cell therapy discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1208-1229
Number of pages22
JournalNeurochemical Research
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012

Fingerprint

Neural Stem Cells
Stem cells
Lipid Metabolism
Cell Differentiation
Lipids
Cell signaling
Sphingolipids
Brain
Lysophospholipids
Stem Cell Niche
G(M1) Ganglioside
Proteins
Adult Stem Cells
Ion exchangers
Sphingomyelins
Eicosanoids
Ceramides
Phosphoprotein Phosphatases
Terpenes
Nuclear Envelope

Keywords

  • Differentiation
  • Eicosanoids
  • Embryonic stem cells
  • Lysophospholipids
  • Neural progenitor cells
  • Sphingolipids
  • Steroids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

It's a lipid's world : Bioactive lipid metabolism and signaling in neural stem cell differentiation. / Bieberich, Erhard.

In: Neurochemical Research, Vol. 37, No. 6, 01.06.2012, p. 1208-1229.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{b7ff30dcf488424abcb8cd385317ca75,
title = "It's a lipid's world: Bioactive lipid metabolism and signaling in neural stem cell differentiation",
abstract = "Lipids are often considered membrane components whose function is to embed proteins into cell membranes. In the last two decades, studies on brain lipids have unequivocally demonstrated that many lipids have critical cell signaling functions; they are called {"}bioactive lipids{"}. Pioneering work in Dr. Robert Ledeen's laboratory has shown that two bioactive brain sphingolipids, sphingomyelin and the ganglioside GM1 are major signaling lipids in the nuclear envelope. In addition to derivatives of the sphingolipid ceramide, the bioactive lipids discussed here belong to the classes of terpenoids and steroids, eicosanoids, and lysophospholipids. These lipids act mainly through two mechanisms: (1) direct interaction between the bioactive lipid and a specific protein binding partner such as a lipid receptor, protein kinase or phosphatase, ion exchanger, or other cell signaling protein; and (2) formation of lipid microdomains or rafts that regulate the activity of a group of raft-associated cell signaling proteins. In recent years, a third mechanism has emerged, which invokes lipid second messengers as a regulator for the energy and redox balance of differentiating neural stem cells (NSCs). Interestingly, developmental niches such as the stem cell niche for adult NSC differentiation may also be metabolic compartments that respond to a distinct combination of bioactive lipids. The biological function of these lipids as regulators of NSC differentiation will be reviewed and their application in stem cell therapy discussed.",
keywords = "Differentiation, Eicosanoids, Embryonic stem cells, Lysophospholipids, Neural progenitor cells, Sphingolipids, Steroids",
author = "Erhard Bieberich",
year = "2012",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11064-011-0698-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "1208--1229",
journal = "Neurochemical Research",
issn = "0364-3190",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - It's a lipid's world

T2 - Bioactive lipid metabolism and signaling in neural stem cell differentiation

AU - Bieberich, Erhard

PY - 2012/6/1

Y1 - 2012/6/1

N2 - Lipids are often considered membrane components whose function is to embed proteins into cell membranes. In the last two decades, studies on brain lipids have unequivocally demonstrated that many lipids have critical cell signaling functions; they are called "bioactive lipids". Pioneering work in Dr. Robert Ledeen's laboratory has shown that two bioactive brain sphingolipids, sphingomyelin and the ganglioside GM1 are major signaling lipids in the nuclear envelope. In addition to derivatives of the sphingolipid ceramide, the bioactive lipids discussed here belong to the classes of terpenoids and steroids, eicosanoids, and lysophospholipids. These lipids act mainly through two mechanisms: (1) direct interaction between the bioactive lipid and a specific protein binding partner such as a lipid receptor, protein kinase or phosphatase, ion exchanger, or other cell signaling protein; and (2) formation of lipid microdomains or rafts that regulate the activity of a group of raft-associated cell signaling proteins. In recent years, a third mechanism has emerged, which invokes lipid second messengers as a regulator for the energy and redox balance of differentiating neural stem cells (NSCs). Interestingly, developmental niches such as the stem cell niche for adult NSC differentiation may also be metabolic compartments that respond to a distinct combination of bioactive lipids. The biological function of these lipids as regulators of NSC differentiation will be reviewed and their application in stem cell therapy discussed.

AB - Lipids are often considered membrane components whose function is to embed proteins into cell membranes. In the last two decades, studies on brain lipids have unequivocally demonstrated that many lipids have critical cell signaling functions; they are called "bioactive lipids". Pioneering work in Dr. Robert Ledeen's laboratory has shown that two bioactive brain sphingolipids, sphingomyelin and the ganglioside GM1 are major signaling lipids in the nuclear envelope. In addition to derivatives of the sphingolipid ceramide, the bioactive lipids discussed here belong to the classes of terpenoids and steroids, eicosanoids, and lysophospholipids. These lipids act mainly through two mechanisms: (1) direct interaction between the bioactive lipid and a specific protein binding partner such as a lipid receptor, protein kinase or phosphatase, ion exchanger, or other cell signaling protein; and (2) formation of lipid microdomains or rafts that regulate the activity of a group of raft-associated cell signaling proteins. In recent years, a third mechanism has emerged, which invokes lipid second messengers as a regulator for the energy and redox balance of differentiating neural stem cells (NSCs). Interestingly, developmental niches such as the stem cell niche for adult NSC differentiation may also be metabolic compartments that respond to a distinct combination of bioactive lipids. The biological function of these lipids as regulators of NSC differentiation will be reviewed and their application in stem cell therapy discussed.

KW - Differentiation

KW - Eicosanoids

KW - Embryonic stem cells

KW - Lysophospholipids

KW - Neural progenitor cells

KW - Sphingolipids

KW - Steroids

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84862846009&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84862846009&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11064-011-0698-5

DO - 10.1007/s11064-011-0698-5

M3 - Review article

C2 - 22246226

AN - SCOPUS:84862846009

VL - 37

SP - 1208

EP - 1229

JO - Neurochemical Research

JF - Neurochemical Research

SN - 0364-3190

IS - 6

ER -