Lower hand grip strength in older adults with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A nationwide population-based study

Beom Jun Kim, Seong Hee Ahn, Seung Hun Lee, Seongbin Hong, Mark W Hamrick, Carlos M Isales, Jung Min Koh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although both liver and muscle are metabolically active endocrine organs, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and sarcopenia may share common pathogenic determinants, there have been few clinical studies of the relationship between NAFLD and muscle strength, especially in the elderly. We conducted a nationally representative population-based, cross-sectional study using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which involved 1,897 men aged ≥50 years and 2,206 postmenopausal women. NAFLD was defined using the hepatic steatosis index (HSI) and low muscle strength was defined using the Korea-specific cut-off point of hand grip strength (HGS). Men and women with NAFLD had 7.3% and 7.9% lower HGS than controls, respectively. The odds ratios for low muscle strength in the presence of NAFLD were 2.51 in men and 2.34 in women. HSI inversely correlated with HGS in both men and women. Consistently, compared with men and women in the lowest HSI quartile, those in the highest quartile had 7.6% and 12.4% lower HGS, respectively, and were 5.63- and 3.58-times more likely to have low muscle strength, respectively. These results provide the first clinical evidence that NAFLD can be associated with muscular impairment in older adults, as demonstrated by lower muscle strength.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4547-4560
Number of pages14
JournalAging
Volume11
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

Keywords

  • Hand grip strength
  • Muscle strength
  • Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
  • Sarcopenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Cell Biology

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