“Mama, I can’t breathe.” Louisville’s dirty air has steep medical and economic costs

John Hans Gilderbloom, Gregory D. Squires, Wesley L. Meares

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The calls for greater racial equity also means cleaning up the air, water, and soil. Poor people needlessly suffer more in Louisville than the same low-income people in West Coast cites. If we adopted the same tough, environmental regulations as our West Coast Counterparts West Louisville would surely bloom instead of slowly die. The unfairness between black and white neighbourhoods is stark and vivid. As the great urbanist, Jane Jacobs, once said_ “everyone hungers for a first class neighbourhood for both pride and dignity … nobody wants a second class neighborhood.” First class neighbourhoods are safe, healthy, sustainable, and prosperous. It is a human right; a Worldwide right.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)619-626
Number of pages8
JournalLocal Environment
Volume25
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2 2020

Keywords

  • Black Lives Matter
  • Environmental justice
  • lifespan
  • pollution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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