Measuring direct and indirect aggression: Is there a response bias?

Mat Gregoski, Wendi A. Malone, Deborah Ruth Richardson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Critics of self-report methods suggest that participants are likely to underreport their own negative behaviors given concerns about social desirability. The current study examined the problem of self-report bias by comparing individuals' estimates of their own and others' aggressive behavior. Undergraduate students (95 women, 50 men) completed the Richardson Conflict Response Questionnaire with regard to either their own behavior or that of another person of the same sex. As expected, participants reported significantly less aggression for themselves than for others. However, self and other ratings showed the same pattern of sex differences. These results suggest that, although individuals may underreport their own aggressive behaviors, this tendency may not affect relationships among variables.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)563-566
Number of pages4
JournalPsychological Reports
Volume97
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

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Aggression
Self Report
Social Desirability
Ego
Sex Characteristics
Students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Measuring direct and indirect aggression : Is there a response bias? / Gregoski, Mat; Malone, Wendi A.; Richardson, Deborah Ruth.

In: Psychological Reports, Vol. 97, No. 2, 01.01.2005, p. 563-566.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Gregoski, Mat ; Malone, Wendi A. ; Richardson, Deborah Ruth. / Measuring direct and indirect aggression : Is there a response bias?. In: Psychological Reports. 2005 ; Vol. 97, No. 2. pp. 563-566.
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