Mechanical injury and repair of cells.

Katsuya Miyake, Paul L McNeil

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To concisely review the field of cell plasma membrane disruption (torn cell surface) and repair. MAIN POINTS: Plasma membrane disruption is a common form of cell injury under physiologic conditions, after trauma, in certain muscular dystrophies, and during certain forms of clinical intervention. Rapid repair of a disruption is essential to cell survival and involves a complex and active cell response that includes membrane fusion and cytoskeletal activation. Tissues, such as cardiac and skeletal muscle, adapt to a disruption injury by hypertrophying. Cells adapt by increasing the efficiency of their resealing response. CONCLUSION: Plasma membrane disruption is an important cellular event in both health and disease. The disruption repair mechanism is now well understood at the cellular level, but much remains to be learned at the molecular level. Cell and tissue level adaptational responses to the disruption either prevent its further occurrence or facilitate future repairs. Therapeutically useful drugs might result if, using this accumulating knowledge, chemical agents can be developed that can enhance repair or adaptive responses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume31
Issue number8 Suppl
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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Cell Membrane
Wounds and Injuries
Membrane Fusion
Muscular Dystrophies
Cell Survival
Myocardium
Skeletal Muscle
Health
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Miyake, K., & McNeil, P. L. (2003). Mechanical injury and repair of cells. Critical Care Medicine, 31(8 Suppl).

Mechanical injury and repair of cells. / Miyake, Katsuya; McNeil, Paul L.

In: Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 31, No. 8 Suppl, 01.01.2003.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Miyake, K & McNeil, PL 2003, 'Mechanical injury and repair of cells.', Critical Care Medicine, vol. 31, no. 8 Suppl.
Miyake K, McNeil PL. Mechanical injury and repair of cells. Critical Care Medicine. 2003 Jan 1;31(8 Suppl).
Miyake, Katsuya ; McNeil, Paul L. / Mechanical injury and repair of cells. In: Critical Care Medicine. 2003 ; Vol. 31, No. 8 Suppl.
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