Modulation of tumor tolerance in primary central nervous system malignancies

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Central nervous system tumors take advantage of the unique immunology of the CNS and develop exquisitely complex stromal networks that promote growth despite the presence of antigen-presenting cells and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. It is precisely this immunological paradox that is essential to the survival of the tumor. We review the evidence for functional CNS immune privilege and the impact it has on tumor tolerance. In this paper, we place an emphasis on the role of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells in maintaining stromal and vascular quiescence, and we underscore the importance of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity as a myeloid-driven tumor tolerance mechanism. Much remains to be discovered regarding the tolerogenic mechanisms by which CNS tumors avoid immune clearance. Thus, it is an open question whether tumor tolerance in the brain is fundamentally different from that of peripheral sites of tumorigenesis or whether it simply stands as a particularly strong example of such tolerance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number937253
JournalClinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume2012
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 19 2012

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Central Nervous System
Neoplasms
Indoleamine-Pyrrole 2,3,-Dioxygenase
Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes
Central Nervous System Neoplasms
Antigen-Presenting Cells
Myeloid Cells
Allergy and Immunology
Blood Vessels
Carcinogenesis
Brain
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Modulation of tumor tolerance in primary central nervous system malignancies. / Johnson, Theodore Samuel; Munn, David H; Maria, Bernard L.

In: Clinical and Developmental Immunology, Vol. 2012, 937253, 19.03.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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