Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

Niraj Desai, Milan R. Patel, L. Michael Prisant, Dilip Abraham Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy is a common cause of sudden, painless loss of vision present commonly on awakening from sleep. It most commonly affects middle-aged and elderly Caucasian men and women. Involvement of the opposite eye occurs within 3 years in less than 43% of patients. Hypertension, diabetes, and nocturnal hypotension are risk factors. A congenital small cup-to-disk ratio also predisposes to the optic nerve ischemia. There is no effective therapy to treat patients acutely or to prevent recurrence. After 6 months of careful follow-up, 57.3% of patients will have no significant change or worsening of their vision in the involved eye.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)130-133
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of clinical hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.)
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

Ischemic Optic Neuropathy
Hypotension
Sleep
Hypertension
Recurrence
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. / Desai, Niraj; Patel, Milan R.; Prisant, L. Michael; Thomas, Dilip Abraham.

In: Journal of clinical hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.), Vol. 7, No. 2, 01.01.2005, p. 130-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Desai, Niraj ; Patel, Milan R. ; Prisant, L. Michael ; Thomas, Dilip Abraham. / Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. In: Journal of clinical hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.). 2005 ; Vol. 7, No. 2. pp. 130-133.
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