Osteogenesis at the dental implant interface

High‐voltage electron microscopic and conventional transmission electron microscopic observations

D. E. Steflik, A. L. Sisk, Gregory R Parr, L. K. Gardner, Philip Jerry Hanes, F. T. Lake, D. J. Berkery, P. Brewer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The osteogenesis of mandibular bone to endosteal dental implants was examined using an in vivo dog model. One half of the implants examined were unloaded implants, with the remaining one half prosthodontically loaded for 6 months. Undecalcified mandibular implant samples were examined with both high‐voltage electron microscopy (HVEM) stereology and routine transmission electron microscopy. The osseous interface to integrated implants was shown to vary in its morphology. Mineralized bone was observed directly apposing the implant, often separated from the implant by an electron‐dense deposit of approximately 50 nm. Within this densely mineralized matrix, osteocytes were routinely observed. Adjacent areas were shown to contain slightly wider zones of either a less dense mineralized matrix or, alternatively, unmineralized tissue. Other zones consisted of wider unmineralized matrices containing collagen fibers and osteoblasts. These latter zones were consistent with the appearance of an appositional type of bone growth. Because bone is a dynamic, actively remodeling tissue, a varied morphology of the support tissues to dental implant is not unexpected. Areas of mature bone interfacing with successfully integrated implants were demonstrated, as well as areas adjacent to the mature bone that were undergoing remodeling or mineralization. This study has also shown that HVEM stereology is a valuable research tool to investigate the oral tissue interface with dental implants. © 1993 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)791-800
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

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Dental prostheses
Dental Implants
Osteogenesis
Bone
Electrons
Bone and Bones
Tissue
Electron Microscopy
Electron microscopy
Osteocytes
Bone Development
Osteoblasts
Transmission Electron Microscopy
Collagen
Dogs
Deposits
Transmission electron microscopy
Research
Fibers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Osteogenesis at the dental implant interface : High‐voltage electron microscopic and conventional transmission electron microscopic observations. / Steflik, D. E.; Sisk, A. L.; Parr, Gregory R; Gardner, L. K.; Hanes, Philip Jerry; Lake, F. T.; Berkery, D. J.; Brewer, P.

In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, Vol. 27, No. 6, 01.01.1993, p. 791-800.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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