Patient acceptance and the psychological effects of women experiencing telecolposcopy and colposcopy

Daron Gale Ferris, Mark S. Litaker, Priscilla Ann Gilman, Ahidee G. Leyva Lopez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The purpose of the study was to assess patient acceptance and psychological effects in women experiencing telecolposcopy compared with colposcopy. Methods: Convenience samples of 150 and 263 women scheduled for colposcopy or telecolposcopy, respectively, completed questionnaires assessing anxiety (Prime MD), depression [Center for Epidemiologic Studies/Depressed Mood Scale (CES-D)], health beliefs and concerns, coping style (Miller Behavioral Style Score) and examination acceptance and satisfaction. Test scores and subject responses were compared using the t test and Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results: Mean scores representing mild anxiety (1.3 and 1.2, P = .7) and mild depression (35.4 and 36.3, P = .4) were reported for the telecolposcopy and colposcopy groups, respectively. The telecolposcopy group indicated significantly greater mean scores for the examination, saving them time and money compared with the colposcopy group. Women in both groups were highly satisfied with their examinations and care. Conclusions: In general, women reported very high levels of satisfaction with telecolposcopy and colposcopy. Potential savings of time and money and improved health care were considered of particular value to women examined by telecolposcopy. Telecolposcopy seems to be well accepted by rural women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)405-411
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Board of Family Practice
Volume16
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1 2003

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Colposcopy
Psychology
Nonparametric Statistics
Anxiety
Depression
Epidemiologic Studies
Delivery of Health Care
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Patient acceptance and the psychological effects of women experiencing telecolposcopy and colposcopy. / Ferris, Daron Gale; Litaker, Mark S.; Gilman, Priscilla Ann; Leyva Lopez, Ahidee G.

In: Journal of the American Board of Family Practice, Vol. 16, No. 5, 01.09.2003, p. 405-411.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ferris, Daron Gale ; Litaker, Mark S. ; Gilman, Priscilla Ann ; Leyva Lopez, Ahidee G. / Patient acceptance and the psychological effects of women experiencing telecolposcopy and colposcopy. In: Journal of the American Board of Family Practice. 2003 ; Vol. 16, No. 5. pp. 405-411.
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