Postprandial effects on electrolyte homeostasis in the kidney

Christine A. Klemens, Michael W. Brands, Alexander Staruschenko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Insulin is known to be an important regulator of a number of different channels and transporters in the kidney, but its role in the kidney to prevent Na+ and volume loss during the osmotic load after a meal has only recently been validated. With increasing numbers of people suffering from diabetes and hypertension, furthering our understanding of insulin signaling and renal Na+ handling in both normal and diseased states is essential for improving patient treatments and outcomes. The present review is focused on postprandial effects on Na+ reabsorption in the kidney and the role of the epithelial Na+ channels as an important channel contributing to insulin-mediated Na+ reclamation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)F1405-F1408
JournalAmerican journal of physiology. Renal physiology
Volume317
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

Fingerprint

Electrolytes
Homeostasis
Kidney
Insulin
Epithelial Sodium Channels
Meals
Hypertension

Keywords

  • epithelial Na+ channel
  • fasting
  • glucose
  • insulin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Urology

Cite this

Postprandial effects on electrolyte homeostasis in the kidney. / Klemens, Christine A.; Brands, Michael W.; Staruschenko, Alexander.

In: American journal of physiology. Renal physiology, Vol. 317, No. 6, 01.12.2019, p. F1405-F1408.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klemens, Christine A. ; Brands, Michael W. ; Staruschenko, Alexander. / Postprandial effects on electrolyte homeostasis in the kidney. In: American journal of physiology. Renal physiology. 2019 ; Vol. 317, No. 6. pp. F1405-F1408.
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