Postural specificity of cardiovascular adaptations to exercise training

C. A. Ray, K. J. Cureton, H. G. Ouzts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purposes of this study were to determine 1) whether posture affects the magnitude of cardiovascular adaptations to training and 2) whether cardiovascular adaptations resulting from exercise training in the supine posture transfer (generalize) to exercise in the upright posture and vice versa. Sixteen sedentary men, aged 18-33 yr, were trained using high-intensity interval and prolonged continuous cycling in the supine (STG; supine training group) or upright (UTG; upright training group) posture 4 days/wk, 40 min/day, for 8 wk, while seven male subjects served as nontraining controls. After training, maximal O2 uptake measured during supine and upright cycling, respectively, increased significantly (P < 0.05) by 22.9 and 16.1% in the STG and by 6.0 and 14.6% in the UTG. No significant cardiovascular adaptations were observed at rest. During submaximal supine cycling at 100 W, significant increases in end-diastolic volume (21%) and stroke volume (22%) (radionuclide ventriculography and CO2 rebreathing) and decreases in heart rate, blood pressure, and systemic vascular resistance occurred in the STG, whereas only a significant decrease in blood pressure occurred in the UTG. During upright cycling at 100 W, a significant decrease in blood pressure occurred in the STG, whereas significant increases in end-diastolic volume (17%) and stroke volume (18%) and decreases in blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance occurred in the UTG. Volume of myocardial contractility, ejection fraction, and systolic blood pressure-to-end-systolic volume ratio did not change significantly after training when measured during supine and upright cycling in either training group. Blood volume increased significantly in the UTG but remained unchanged in the STG. No significant metabolic or cardiovascular changes occurred in the control group. It was concluded that the magnitude of cardiovascular adaptations to training in the supine and upright posture is not different. However, changes are, for the most part, specific to the training posture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2202-2208
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume69
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • blood pressure
  • end-diastolic volume
  • end-systolic volume
  • heart rate
  • radionuclide ventriculography
  • stroke volume
  • systemic vascular resistance
  • training specificity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Postural specificity of cardiovascular adaptations to exercise training'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this