Potential and actual arms production: Implications for the arms trade debate

Jurgen Brauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper I develop indices and rankings of potential and actual arms production for about one hundred and fifty countries for data pertaining to the early to mid-1990s. The countries' ranked indices are then compared. I find evidence that countries that can produce arms (potential) do produce arms (actual). I also compare the current findings to findings published nine years ago, pertaining to potential and actual arms production in developing nations for the early 1980s. A number of countries then having the potential to produce arms have, in fact, become major arms producers ten years later. The results presented in this paper carry policy implications for the arms trade debate: shall policymakers continue to focus on arms supply restriction and continue to ignore the increasing capacity of developing nations to self-supply their arms demand?

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-480
Number of pages20
JournalDefence and Peace Economics
Volume11
Issue number5
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000

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arms trade
ranking
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supply
demand
evidence
Arms production
Arms trade
Developing nations

Keywords

  • Arms production
  • Arms trade

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Potential and actual arms production : Implications for the arms trade debate. / Brauer, Jurgen.

In: Defence and Peace Economics, Vol. 11, No. 5, 01.12.2000, p. 461-480.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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