Practice management models in emergency medicine

Robert E Suter, Chet Schrader

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Key learning points Discuss the influence of a nation’s healthcare financing and payment policies on the available choices of emergency medicine practice models. List the types of emergency medicine practice models that are used worldwide, and the relative advantages and/or disadvantages of each. Describe models of collaborative practice between emergency physicians that can improve patient care. Introduction In most developed countries, the practice of assigning physicians to staff the emergency department (ED) became common in the twentieth century. Originally staffed by young physicians-in-training and/or nurses, only in the past 40–50 years has the ED begun to be staffed by attending medical staff – most recently by trained emergency medicine specialists – with continued development of this trend globally. Since the birth of emergency medicine as a specialty, there have been dynamic changes in staffing and practice models in the ED that reflect the increasing professionalism and sophistication of emergency medicine practice. This has led to the continued expansion and refinement of practices, and the exploration of diverse scopes of ownership and control similar to that found in other specialties. While expansion of roles is occurring, emergency physicians are for the most part characterized by their clinical practice in the hospital ED. Globally, in any individual hospital the type of emergency medicine practice model used is ultimately a function of the variables of the specific practice setting. These variables include hospital type, available reimbursement mechanisms, and local laws concerning the practice of medicine and nursing. All of these factors contribute to significant diversity in emergency medicine practice management models.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEmergency Department Leadership and Management
Subtitle of host publicationBest Principles and Practice
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages270-278
Number of pages9
ISBN (Electronic)9781139030557
ISBN (Print)9781107007390
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Emergency Medicine
Practice Management
Hospital Emergency Service
Physicians
Reimbursement Mechanisms
Emergencies
Healthcare Financing
Hospital Medicine
Ownership
Medical Staff
Hospital Departments
Developed Countries
Patient Care
Nursing
Nurses
Medicine
Learning
Parturition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Suter, R. E., & Schrader, C. (2014). Practice management models in emergency medicine. In Emergency Department Leadership and Management: Best Principles and Practice (pp. 270-278). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139030557.026

Practice management models in emergency medicine. / Suter, Robert E; Schrader, Chet.

Emergency Department Leadership and Management: Best Principles and Practice. Cambridge University Press, 2014. p. 270-278.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Suter, RE & Schrader, C 2014, Practice management models in emergency medicine. in Emergency Department Leadership and Management: Best Principles and Practice. Cambridge University Press, pp. 270-278. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139030557.026
Suter RE, Schrader C. Practice management models in emergency medicine. In Emergency Department Leadership and Management: Best Principles and Practice. Cambridge University Press. 2014. p. 270-278 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139030557.026
Suter, Robert E ; Schrader, Chet. / Practice management models in emergency medicine. Emergency Department Leadership and Management: Best Principles and Practice. Cambridge University Press, 2014. pp. 270-278
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