Prediction of initial cytogenetic response for subsequent major and complete cytogenetic response to imatinib mesylate therapy in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia

Hagop Kantarjian, Moshe Talpaz, Susan O'Brien, Francis Giles, Mary Beth Rios, Kevin White, Guillermo Garcia-Manero, Alessandra Ferrajoli, Srdan Verstovsek, William Wierda, Steven Kornblau, Jorge Cortes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND. Obtaining a major (Philadelphia chromosome [Ph] of < 35%) or a complete cytogenetic response (Ph of 0%) has been associated with excellent long-term survival. Cytogenetic response may continue to improve with therapy. Because early allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) may be associated with a better outcome, early parameters predicting for subsequent cytogenetic responses would optimize the treatment decision-making. METHODS. The current study was performed to analyze whether early cytogenetic responses may be predictive of later major or complete cytogenetic responses to imatinib mesylate therapy in patients with Ph-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). RESULTS. Two hundred sixty-one patients with Ph-positive, chronic-phase CML after failure with interferon therapy who were treated with imatinib mesylate therapy were analyzed. A persistence of 100% Ph-positive cells after ≥ 6 months of imatinib mesylate therapy was associated with a major cytogenetic response rate of 9-13% and a complete cytogenetic response rate of 0-4%. However, a minor cytogenetic response after 3-12 months of therapy still was associated with high rates of major (68-83%) or complete (35-54%) cytogenetic response rates. CONCLUSIONS. Patients with Ph-positive, chronic-phase CML who have persistent 100% Ph-positive disease after ≥ 6 months of imatinib mesylate therapy may be offered allogeneic SCT or considered for alternative investigational therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2225-2228
Number of pages4
JournalCancer
Volume97
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Philadelphia Chromosome
Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive
Cytogenetics
Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic Phase
Therapeutics
Stem Cell Transplantation
Imatinib Mesylate
Investigational Therapies
Complementary Therapies
Interferons
Decision Making
Survival

Keywords

  • Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)
  • Cytogenetic response
  • Imatinib mesylate
  • Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Prediction of initial cytogenetic response for subsequent major and complete cytogenetic response to imatinib mesylate therapy in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia. / Kantarjian, Hagop; Talpaz, Moshe; O'Brien, Susan; Giles, Francis; Rios, Mary Beth; White, Kevin; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Verstovsek, Srdan; Wierda, William; Kornblau, Steven; Cortes, Jorge.

In: Cancer, Vol. 97, No. 9, 01.05.2003, p. 2225-2228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kantarjian, H, Talpaz, M, O'Brien, S, Giles, F, Rios, MB, White, K, Garcia-Manero, G, Ferrajoli, A, Verstovsek, S, Wierda, W, Kornblau, S & Cortes, J 2003, 'Prediction of initial cytogenetic response for subsequent major and complete cytogenetic response to imatinib mesylate therapy in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia', Cancer, vol. 97, no. 9, pp. 2225-2228. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.11381
Kantarjian, Hagop ; Talpaz, Moshe ; O'Brien, Susan ; Giles, Francis ; Rios, Mary Beth ; White, Kevin ; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo ; Ferrajoli, Alessandra ; Verstovsek, Srdan ; Wierda, William ; Kornblau, Steven ; Cortes, Jorge. / Prediction of initial cytogenetic response for subsequent major and complete cytogenetic response to imatinib mesylate therapy in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia. In: Cancer. 2003 ; Vol. 97, No. 9. pp. 2225-2228.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND. Obtaining a major (Philadelphia chromosome [Ph] of < 35{\%}) or a complete cytogenetic response (Ph of 0{\%}) has been associated with excellent long-term survival. Cytogenetic response may continue to improve with therapy. Because early allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) may be associated with a better outcome, early parameters predicting for subsequent cytogenetic responses would optimize the treatment decision-making. METHODS. The current study was performed to analyze whether early cytogenetic responses may be predictive of later major or complete cytogenetic responses to imatinib mesylate therapy in patients with Ph-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). RESULTS. Two hundred sixty-one patients with Ph-positive, chronic-phase CML after failure with interferon therapy who were treated with imatinib mesylate therapy were analyzed. A persistence of 100{\%} Ph-positive cells after ≥ 6 months of imatinib mesylate therapy was associated with a major cytogenetic response rate of 9-13{\%} and a complete cytogenetic response rate of 0-4{\%}. However, a minor cytogenetic response after 3-12 months of therapy still was associated with high rates of major (68-83{\%}) or complete (35-54{\%}) cytogenetic response rates. CONCLUSIONS. Patients with Ph-positive, chronic-phase CML who have persistent 100{\%} Ph-positive disease after ≥ 6 months of imatinib mesylate therapy may be offered allogeneic SCT or considered for alternative investigational therapies.",
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AU - Kantarjian, Hagop

AU - Talpaz, Moshe

AU - O'Brien, Susan

AU - Giles, Francis

AU - Rios, Mary Beth

AU - White, Kevin

AU - Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

AU - Ferrajoli, Alessandra

AU - Verstovsek, Srdan

AU - Wierda, William

AU - Kornblau, Steven

AU - Cortes, Jorge

PY - 2003/5/1

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N2 - BACKGROUND. Obtaining a major (Philadelphia chromosome [Ph] of < 35%) or a complete cytogenetic response (Ph of 0%) has been associated with excellent long-term survival. Cytogenetic response may continue to improve with therapy. Because early allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) may be associated with a better outcome, early parameters predicting for subsequent cytogenetic responses would optimize the treatment decision-making. METHODS. The current study was performed to analyze whether early cytogenetic responses may be predictive of later major or complete cytogenetic responses to imatinib mesylate therapy in patients with Ph-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). RESULTS. Two hundred sixty-one patients with Ph-positive, chronic-phase CML after failure with interferon therapy who were treated with imatinib mesylate therapy were analyzed. A persistence of 100% Ph-positive cells after ≥ 6 months of imatinib mesylate therapy was associated with a major cytogenetic response rate of 9-13% and a complete cytogenetic response rate of 0-4%. However, a minor cytogenetic response after 3-12 months of therapy still was associated with high rates of major (68-83%) or complete (35-54%) cytogenetic response rates. CONCLUSIONS. Patients with Ph-positive, chronic-phase CML who have persistent 100% Ph-positive disease after ≥ 6 months of imatinib mesylate therapy may be offered allogeneic SCT or considered for alternative investigational therapies.

AB - BACKGROUND. Obtaining a major (Philadelphia chromosome [Ph] of < 35%) or a complete cytogenetic response (Ph of 0%) has been associated with excellent long-term survival. Cytogenetic response may continue to improve with therapy. Because early allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) may be associated with a better outcome, early parameters predicting for subsequent cytogenetic responses would optimize the treatment decision-making. METHODS. The current study was performed to analyze whether early cytogenetic responses may be predictive of later major or complete cytogenetic responses to imatinib mesylate therapy in patients with Ph-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). RESULTS. Two hundred sixty-one patients with Ph-positive, chronic-phase CML after failure with interferon therapy who were treated with imatinib mesylate therapy were analyzed. A persistence of 100% Ph-positive cells after ≥ 6 months of imatinib mesylate therapy was associated with a major cytogenetic response rate of 9-13% and a complete cytogenetic response rate of 0-4%. However, a minor cytogenetic response after 3-12 months of therapy still was associated with high rates of major (68-83%) or complete (35-54%) cytogenetic response rates. CONCLUSIONS. Patients with Ph-positive, chronic-phase CML who have persistent 100% Ph-positive disease after ≥ 6 months of imatinib mesylate therapy may be offered allogeneic SCT or considered for alternative investigational therapies.

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KW - Imatinib mesylate

KW - Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)

KW - Survival

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