Prognostic factors for alveolar regeneration: Effect of a space-providing biomaterial on guided tissue regeneration

Giuseppe Polimeni, Ki Tae Koo, Mohammed Qahash, Andreas V. Xiropaidis, Jasim M. Albandar, Ulf M E Wikesjö

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: There is a limited understanding of the effect of bone biomaterials on the healing potential when used in conjunction with guided tissue regeneration (GTR). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a space-providing coral-derived biomaterial on alveolar bone regeneration in conjunction with GTR. Methods: Bilateral, critical-size, 6-mm, supra-alveolar, periodontal defects were created in four young adult Beagle dogs. In a split-mouth design, the animals received an ePTFE device to provide for GTR in contralateral defect sites with or without the coral biomaterial. The animals were euthanized at 4 weeks post surgery. A histometric analysis assessed vertical regeneration of alveolar bone relative to space-provision by the ePTFE device. Because of the correlation of within-dog measurements, a mixed model ANOVA was used to analyze the data. Results: There was significantly greater mean bone regeneration in sites receiving calcium carbonate coral implant GTR (cGTR) compared to GTR (p < 0.0001). Sites providing larger wound areas exhibited greater bone regeneration compared to sites exhibiting smaller wound areas (p < 0.0001). However, grouping the sites by wound area thresholds showed that bone regeneration was not significantly different in sites receiving cGTR compared to sites receiving GTR alone, irrespective of the size of the wound area (p > 0.5). Conclusions: Space-provision has a significant effect on bone regeneration following GTR. The coral biomaterial effectively enhances space-provision, and this appears to be the principal mechanism by which this biomaterial supports bone regeneration rather than postulated osteoconductive properties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)725-729
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Periodontology
Volume31
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2004

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Guided Tissue Regeneration
Biocompatible Materials
Bone Regeneration
Regeneration
Anthozoa
Dogs
Equipment and Supplies
Calcium Carbonate
Mouth
Young Adult
Analysis of Variance
Bone and Bones

Keywords

  • Alveolar bone
  • Bone biomaterials
  • Experimental studies
  • Guided tissue regeneration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Periodontics

Cite this

Prognostic factors for alveolar regeneration : Effect of a space-providing biomaterial on guided tissue regeneration. / Polimeni, Giuseppe; Koo, Ki Tae; Qahash, Mohammed; Xiropaidis, Andreas V.; Albandar, Jasim M.; Wikesjö, Ulf M E.

In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Vol. 31, No. 9, 01.09.2004, p. 725-729.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Polimeni, Giuseppe ; Koo, Ki Tae ; Qahash, Mohammed ; Xiropaidis, Andreas V. ; Albandar, Jasim M. ; Wikesjö, Ulf M E. / Prognostic factors for alveolar regeneration : Effect of a space-providing biomaterial on guided tissue regeneration. In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology. 2004 ; Vol. 31, No. 9. pp. 725-729.
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