Registration of physical space to laparoscopic image space for use in minimally invasive hepatic surgery

J. D. Stefansic, A. J. Herline, Y. Shyr, W. C. Chapman, J. M. Fitzpatrick, B. M. Dawant, R. L. Galloway

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While laparoscopes are used for numerous minimally invasive (MI) procedures, MI liver resection and ablative surgery is infrequently performed. The paucity of cases is due to the restriction of the field of view by the laparoscope and the difficulty in determining tumor location and margins under video guidance. By merging MI surgery with interactive, image-guided surgery (ITGS), we hope to overcome localization difficulties present in laparoscopic liver procedures. One key component of any DGS system is the development of accurate registration techniques to map image space to physical or patient space. This manuscript focuses on the accuracy and analysis of the direct linear transformation (DLT) method to register physical space with laparoscopic image space on both distorted and distortion-corrected video images. Experiments were conducted on a liver-sized plastic phantom affixed with 20 markers at various depths. After localizing the points in both physical and laparoscopic image space, registration accuracy was assessed for different combinations and numbers of control points (n) to determine the quantity necessary to develop a robust registration matrix. For n = 11, average target registration error (TRE) was 0.70 ± 0.20 mm. We also studied the effects of distortion correction on registration accuracy. For the particular distortion correction method and laparoscope used in our experiments, there was no statistical significance between physical to image registration error for distorted and corrected images. In cases where a minimum number of control points (n = 6) are acquired, the DLT is often not stable and the mathematical process can lead to high TRE values. Mathematical filters developed through the analysis of the DLT were used to prospectively eliminate outlier cases where the TRE was high. For n = 6, prefilter average TRE was 17.4 ± 153 mm for all trials; when the filters were applied, average TRE decreased to 1.64 ± 1.10 mm for the remaining trials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBiomedical Imaging V - Proceedings of the 5th IEEE EMBS International Summer School on Biomedical Imaging, SSBI 2002
EditorsChristian Roux, Jean-Louis Coatrieux
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)0780375076, 9780780375079
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Event5th IEEE EMBS International Summer School on Biomedical Imaging, SSBI 2002 - Berder Island, France
Duration: Jun 15 2002Jun 23 2002

Publication series

NameBiomedical Imaging V - Proceedings of the 5th IEEE EMBS International Summer School on Biomedical Imaging, SSBI 2002

Other

Other5th IEEE EMBS International Summer School on Biomedical Imaging, SSBI 2002
CountryFrance
CityBerder Island
Period6/15/026/23/02

Fingerprint

Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures
Laparoscopes
Liver
Computer-Assisted Surgery
Plastics
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Image distortion correction
  • image registration
  • image-guided surgery
  • minimally invasive surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Stefansic, J. D., Herline, A. J., Shyr, Y., Chapman, W. C., Fitzpatrick, J. M., Dawant, B. M., & Galloway, R. L. (2002). Registration of physical space to laparoscopic image space for use in minimally invasive hepatic surgery. In C. Roux, & J-L. Coatrieux (Eds.), Biomedical Imaging V - Proceedings of the 5th IEEE EMBS International Summer School on Biomedical Imaging, SSBI 2002 [1233999] (Biomedical Imaging V - Proceedings of the 5th IEEE EMBS International Summer School on Biomedical Imaging, SSBI 2002). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/SSBI.2002.1233999

Registration of physical space to laparoscopic image space for use in minimally invasive hepatic surgery. / Stefansic, J. D.; Herline, A. J.; Shyr, Y.; Chapman, W. C.; Fitzpatrick, J. M.; Dawant, B. M.; Galloway, R. L.

Biomedical Imaging V - Proceedings of the 5th IEEE EMBS International Summer School on Biomedical Imaging, SSBI 2002. ed. / Christian Roux; Jean-Louis Coatrieux. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2002. 1233999 (Biomedical Imaging V - Proceedings of the 5th IEEE EMBS International Summer School on Biomedical Imaging, SSBI 2002).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Stefansic, JD, Herline, AJ, Shyr, Y, Chapman, WC, Fitzpatrick, JM, Dawant, BM & Galloway, RL 2002, Registration of physical space to laparoscopic image space for use in minimally invasive hepatic surgery. in C Roux & J-L Coatrieux (eds), Biomedical Imaging V - Proceedings of the 5th IEEE EMBS International Summer School on Biomedical Imaging, SSBI 2002., 1233999, Biomedical Imaging V - Proceedings of the 5th IEEE EMBS International Summer School on Biomedical Imaging, SSBI 2002, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 5th IEEE EMBS International Summer School on Biomedical Imaging, SSBI 2002, Berder Island, France, 6/15/02. https://doi.org/10.1109/SSBI.2002.1233999
Stefansic JD, Herline AJ, Shyr Y, Chapman WC, Fitzpatrick JM, Dawant BM et al. Registration of physical space to laparoscopic image space for use in minimally invasive hepatic surgery. In Roux C, Coatrieux J-L, editors, Biomedical Imaging V - Proceedings of the 5th IEEE EMBS International Summer School on Biomedical Imaging, SSBI 2002. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2002. 1233999. (Biomedical Imaging V - Proceedings of the 5th IEEE EMBS International Summer School on Biomedical Imaging, SSBI 2002). https://doi.org/10.1109/SSBI.2002.1233999
Stefansic, J. D. ; Herline, A. J. ; Shyr, Y. ; Chapman, W. C. ; Fitzpatrick, J. M. ; Dawant, B. M. ; Galloway, R. L. / Registration of physical space to laparoscopic image space for use in minimally invasive hepatic surgery. Biomedical Imaging V - Proceedings of the 5th IEEE EMBS International Summer School on Biomedical Imaging, SSBI 2002. editor / Christian Roux ; Jean-Louis Coatrieux. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2002. (Biomedical Imaging V - Proceedings of the 5th IEEE EMBS International Summer School on Biomedical Imaging, SSBI 2002).
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