Relationship between childhood body mass index and young adult asthma

Minto Porter, Ganesa Wegienka, Suzanne Havstad, Christian G. Nageotte, Christine Cole Johnson, Dennis Randall Ownby, Edward M. Zoratti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The relationship between obesity and asthma is an area of debate. Objective: To investigate the association of elevated body mass index (BMI) at a young age and young adult asthma. Methods: BMI, questionnaires, and serologic tests results were analyzed in participants of a predominantly white, middle-class, population-based birth cohort from Detroit, Michigan at 6 to 8 and 18 years of age. Asthma diagnosis was based on medical record data. Allergen specific IgE was analyzed using UniCAP, with atopy defined as 1 or more allergen specific IgE levels of 0.35 kU/L or higher. Overweight was defined as a BMI in 85th percentile or higher. Results: A total of 10.6% of overweight males at 6 to 8 years of age had current asthma at 18 to 20 years of age compared with 3.2% of males who were normal or underweight (relative risk [RR], 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-11.0; P=.048). A total of 19.6% of females who were overweight at 6 to 8 years of age had asthma compared with 10.3% of females who were normal or underweight (RR, 1.9; 95% CI, 0.9-3.9; P=.09). After adjustment for atopy at 6 to 8 years of age, overweight males had an adjusted RR of 4.7 (95% CI, 1.4-16.2; P=.01), and overweight females had an adjusted RR of 1.7 (95% CI, 0.8-3.3; P=.15). Change in BMI between 6 to 8 years of age and 18 to 20 years of age was also examined. Patients with persistently elevated BMI exhibited increased risk of asthma as young adults (RR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.2-4.7) but not with an increasing BMI (RR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.3-2.2) or a decreasing BMI (RR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.3-2.2). Conclusion: Overweight males 6 to 8 years of age have increased risk of asthma as young adults. Being overweight remains a predictor of asthma after adjustment for early atopy. A similar but not statistically significant trend was also seen among overweight females. Overweight body habitus throughout childhood is a risk factor for young adult asthma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)408-411.e1
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume109
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

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Young Adult
Body Mass Index
Asthma
Confidence Intervals
Thinness
Allergens
Immunoglobulin E
Serologic Tests
Social Class
Medical Records
Obesity
Parturition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Porter, M., Wegienka, G., Havstad, S., Nageotte, C. G., Johnson, C. C., Ownby, D. R., & Zoratti, E. M. (2012). Relationship between childhood body mass index and young adult asthma. Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, 109(6), 408-411.e1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2012.09.009

Relationship between childhood body mass index and young adult asthma. / Porter, Minto; Wegienka, Ganesa; Havstad, Suzanne; Nageotte, Christian G.; Johnson, Christine Cole; Ownby, Dennis Randall; Zoratti, Edward M.

In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Vol. 109, No. 6, 01.01.2012, p. 408-411.e1.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Porter, M, Wegienka, G, Havstad, S, Nageotte, CG, Johnson, CC, Ownby, DR & Zoratti, EM 2012, 'Relationship between childhood body mass index and young adult asthma', Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, vol. 109, no. 6, pp. 408-411.e1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2012.09.009
Porter, Minto ; Wegienka, Ganesa ; Havstad, Suzanne ; Nageotte, Christian G. ; Johnson, Christine Cole ; Ownby, Dennis Randall ; Zoratti, Edward M. / Relationship between childhood body mass index and young adult asthma. In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 2012 ; Vol. 109, No. 6. pp. 408-411.e1.
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abstract = "Background: The relationship between obesity and asthma is an area of debate. Objective: To investigate the association of elevated body mass index (BMI) at a young age and young adult asthma. Methods: BMI, questionnaires, and serologic tests results were analyzed in participants of a predominantly white, middle-class, population-based birth cohort from Detroit, Michigan at 6 to 8 and 18 years of age. Asthma diagnosis was based on medical record data. Allergen specific IgE was analyzed using UniCAP, with atopy defined as 1 or more allergen specific IgE levels of 0.35 kU/L or higher. Overweight was defined as a BMI in 85th percentile or higher. Results: A total of 10.6{\%} of overweight males at 6 to 8 years of age had current asthma at 18 to 20 years of age compared with 3.2{\%} of males who were normal or underweight (relative risk [RR], 3.3; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.0-11.0; P=.048). A total of 19.6{\%} of females who were overweight at 6 to 8 years of age had asthma compared with 10.3{\%} of females who were normal or underweight (RR, 1.9; 95{\%} CI, 0.9-3.9; P=.09). After adjustment for atopy at 6 to 8 years of age, overweight males had an adjusted RR of 4.7 (95{\%} CI, 1.4-16.2; P=.01), and overweight females had an adjusted RR of 1.7 (95{\%} CI, 0.8-3.3; P=.15). Change in BMI between 6 to 8 years of age and 18 to 20 years of age was also examined. Patients with persistently elevated BMI exhibited increased risk of asthma as young adults (RR, 2.4; 95{\%} CI, 1.2-4.7) but not with an increasing BMI (RR, 0.8; 95{\%} CI, 0.3-2.2) or a decreasing BMI (RR, 0.8; 95{\%} CI, 0.3-2.2). Conclusion: Overweight males 6 to 8 years of age have increased risk of asthma as young adults. Being overweight remains a predictor of asthma after adjustment for early atopy. A similar but not statistically significant trend was also seen among overweight females. Overweight body habitus throughout childhood is a risk factor for young adult asthma.",
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N2 - Background: The relationship between obesity and asthma is an area of debate. Objective: To investigate the association of elevated body mass index (BMI) at a young age and young adult asthma. Methods: BMI, questionnaires, and serologic tests results were analyzed in participants of a predominantly white, middle-class, population-based birth cohort from Detroit, Michigan at 6 to 8 and 18 years of age. Asthma diagnosis was based on medical record data. Allergen specific IgE was analyzed using UniCAP, with atopy defined as 1 or more allergen specific IgE levels of 0.35 kU/L or higher. Overweight was defined as a BMI in 85th percentile or higher. Results: A total of 10.6% of overweight males at 6 to 8 years of age had current asthma at 18 to 20 years of age compared with 3.2% of males who were normal or underweight (relative risk [RR], 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-11.0; P=.048). A total of 19.6% of females who were overweight at 6 to 8 years of age had asthma compared with 10.3% of females who were normal or underweight (RR, 1.9; 95% CI, 0.9-3.9; P=.09). After adjustment for atopy at 6 to 8 years of age, overweight males had an adjusted RR of 4.7 (95% CI, 1.4-16.2; P=.01), and overweight females had an adjusted RR of 1.7 (95% CI, 0.8-3.3; P=.15). Change in BMI between 6 to 8 years of age and 18 to 20 years of age was also examined. Patients with persistently elevated BMI exhibited increased risk of asthma as young adults (RR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.2-4.7) but not with an increasing BMI (RR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.3-2.2) or a decreasing BMI (RR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.3-2.2). Conclusion: Overweight males 6 to 8 years of age have increased risk of asthma as young adults. Being overweight remains a predictor of asthma after adjustment for early atopy. A similar but not statistically significant trend was also seen among overweight females. Overweight body habitus throughout childhood is a risk factor for young adult asthma.

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