Relationship between daily fluoride intake from diet and the use of dentifrice and human plasma fluoride concentrations

Vanessa E.S. Cardoso, Gary M. Whitford, Marília A.R. Buzalaf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The literature contains reports of the relationship between the fluoride concentrations in drinking water and human plasma. None of these studies, however, documented individual levels of daily fluoride intake, which can vary considerably among individuals served by the same water supply. Furthermore, while water can be an important source of fluoride, other sources, especially fluoridated dentifrices, also contribute substantially. This 2-day study with five 25-35-year-old subjects in each of three communities (Bauru, 0.6-0.8 ppm F; Domelia, 0.7 ppm F; Floresta, 0.3 ppm F) determined plasma fluoride concentrations and fluoride intake from diet and the use of dentifrice which, together, approximate total daily fluoride intake. The purposes were to determine: (1) the extent to which plasma fluoride concentrations approached levels known to affect the quality and quantity of bone; (2) the relationship between fluoride intake and plasma concentrations. Plasma was collected at 4-h intervals starting at 0800 h and ending at 2000 h each day. Average fluoride intakes from diet and the use of dentifrice in the three communities ranged from 0.16 to 0.82 mg/day and from 0.29 to 3.16 mg/day, respectively. The overall average plasma concentrations in the three communities were 0.44, 0.45 and 0.54 μmol/l (P < 0.005). They were directly related to intake from the use of dentifrice (P = 0.030) and to total intake (P = 0.033), but were not related to dietary intake (P = 0.176). In conclusion, despite fluoride intake from various sources, the plasma fluoride concentrations of the study subjects remained at levels far below those associated with effects on bone production.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)552-557
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Oral Biology
Volume51
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2006

Fingerprint

Dentifrices
Fluorides
Diet
Bone and Bones
Water Supply
Drinking Water

Keywords

  • Dentifrice
  • Diet
  • Fluoride intake
  • Plasma fluoride

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Dentistry(all)
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Relationship between daily fluoride intake from diet and the use of dentifrice and human plasma fluoride concentrations. / Cardoso, Vanessa E.S.; Whitford, Gary M.; Buzalaf, Marília A.R.

In: Archives of Oral Biology, Vol. 51, No. 7, 01.07.2006, p. 552-557.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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