RESEARCH NOTE: DOES EXPOSURE OF HUMAN SKIN in situ TO 385 OR 405 nm UV INDUCE PYRIMIDINE DIMERS IN DNA?

Haim Hacham, Steven E. Freeman, Richard W. Gange, Daniel J. Maytum, John C. Sutherland, Betsy M. Sutherland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract— A previous report [Freeman et al.(1986) Photochem. Photobiol.43S, 93S] indicated that irradiation of human skin in situ with 385 or 405 nm radiation produced detectable levels of pyrimidine dimers in DNA. Since these wavelengths are absorbed poorly by DNA, these results suggested that DNA damage was sensitized by other absorbing molecules present in skin. Examination of two experimental aspects of the previous work indicates that (1) the static gel electrophoresis method for DNA dispersion used in lesion determination gave accurate values of the levels of induced dimers, and (2) the DNA damage apparently induced by 385 nm was actually induced by shorter wavelength UV present in the 20 nm bandpass beam of the monochromator. The current results indicate that monochromatic 385 and 405 nm radiation are ineffective in dimer production in human skin in situ.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)893-896
Number of pages4
JournalPhotochemistry and Photobiology
Volume52
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1990

Fingerprint

Pyrimidine Dimers
pyrimidines
Skin
deoxyribonucleic acid
dimers
DNA Damage
DNA
Research
Radiation
Dimers
Electrophoresis
damage
Wavelength
Gels
Monochromators
radiation
electrophoresis
monochromators
wavelengths
lesions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

RESEARCH NOTE : DOES EXPOSURE OF HUMAN SKIN in situ TO 385 OR 405 nm UV INDUCE PYRIMIDINE DIMERS IN DNA? / Hacham, Haim; Freeman, Steven E.; Gange, Richard W.; Maytum, Daniel J.; Sutherland, John C.; Sutherland, Betsy M.

In: Photochemistry and Photobiology, Vol. 52, No. 4, 10.1990, p. 893-896.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hacham, Haim ; Freeman, Steven E. ; Gange, Richard W. ; Maytum, Daniel J. ; Sutherland, John C. ; Sutherland, Betsy M. / RESEARCH NOTE : DOES EXPOSURE OF HUMAN SKIN in situ TO 385 OR 405 nm UV INDUCE PYRIMIDINE DIMERS IN DNA?. In: Photochemistry and Photobiology. 1990 ; Vol. 52, No. 4. pp. 893-896.
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