Seeing red: Affect modulation and chromatic color responses on the Rorschach

Johanna C. Malone, Michelle B. Stein, Jenelle Slavin-Mulford, Iruma Bello, S. Justin Sinclair, Mark A. Blais

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Psychoanalytic theories suggest that color perception on the Rorschach relates to affective modulation. However, this idea has minimal empirical support. Using a clinical sample, the authors explored the cognitive and clinical correlates of Rorschach color determinants and differences among four affective modulation subtypes: Controlled, Balanced, Under-Controlled, and Flooded. Subtypes were differentiated by measures of affective regulation, reality testing/confusion, and personality traits. Initial support for the relationship of chromatic color response styles and affective modulation was found.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)70-93
Number of pages24
JournalBulletin of the Menninger Clinic
Volume77
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2013

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Color
Reality Testing
Color Perception
Psychoanalytic Theory
Confusion
Personality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Seeing red : Affect modulation and chromatic color responses on the Rorschach. / Malone, Johanna C.; Stein, Michelle B.; Slavin-Mulford, Jenelle; Bello, Iruma; Sinclair, S. Justin; Blais, Mark A.

In: Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, Vol. 77, No. 1, 01.03.2013, p. 70-93.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Malone, Johanna C. ; Stein, Michelle B. ; Slavin-Mulford, Jenelle ; Bello, Iruma ; Sinclair, S. Justin ; Blais, Mark A. / Seeing red : Affect modulation and chromatic color responses on the Rorschach. In: Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. 2013 ; Vol. 77, No. 1. pp. 70-93.
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