Sisterhood is Too Powerful for Television: Adapting the Wonder Woman Family From Comics to the Small Screen

Familial Bonding in Film and Television since 1950

Ruth McClelland-Nugent, Ruth E Nugent

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The adaptation of Wonder Woman from a comic book form to a successful television show was not an easy process. Initially conceived of as a campy, humourous program like the very successful Batman, the show gradually evolved into a more serious action-oriented program with a nod towards feminist messages. Yet the increased feminist themes in Season 2 came at the expense of the feminist context of Wonder Woman's all-female family, her mother and sister, who disappeared entirely from the program. This reflects a trend in 1970s popular culture, or promoting feminist slogans while undermining feminist principles.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBound By Love
Subtitle of host publicationFamilial Bonding in Film and Television since 1950
EditorsLaura Mattoon D’Amore
PublisherCambridge Scholars Press
Pages19-32
ISBN (Print)1-4438-2985-4
StatePublished - Aug 2011

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television show
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Cite this

McClelland-Nugent, R., & Nugent, R. E. (2011). Sisterhood is Too Powerful for Television: Adapting the Wonder Woman Family From Comics to the Small Screen: Familial Bonding in Film and Television since 1950. In L. Mattoon D’Amore (Ed.), Bound By Love: Familial Bonding in Film and Television since 1950 (pp. 19-32). Cambridge Scholars Press.

Sisterhood is Too Powerful for Television: Adapting the Wonder Woman Family From Comics to the Small Screen : Familial Bonding in Film and Television since 1950. / McClelland-Nugent, Ruth; Nugent, Ruth E.

Bound By Love: Familial Bonding in Film and Television since 1950. ed. / Laura Mattoon D’Amore. Cambridge Scholars Press, 2011. p. 19-32.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

McClelland-Nugent, R & Nugent, RE 2011, Sisterhood is Too Powerful for Television: Adapting the Wonder Woman Family From Comics to the Small Screen: Familial Bonding in Film and Television since 1950. in L Mattoon D’Amore (ed.), Bound By Love: Familial Bonding in Film and Television since 1950. Cambridge Scholars Press, pp. 19-32.
McClelland-Nugent R, Nugent RE. Sisterhood is Too Powerful for Television: Adapting the Wonder Woman Family From Comics to the Small Screen: Familial Bonding in Film and Television since 1950. In Mattoon D’Amore L, editor, Bound By Love: Familial Bonding in Film and Television since 1950. Cambridge Scholars Press. 2011. p. 19-32
McClelland-Nugent, Ruth ; Nugent, Ruth E. / Sisterhood is Too Powerful for Television: Adapting the Wonder Woman Family From Comics to the Small Screen : Familial Bonding in Film and Television since 1950. Bound By Love: Familial Bonding in Film and Television since 1950. editor / Laura Mattoon D’Amore. Cambridge Scholars Press, 2011. pp. 19-32
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