Subtenon's depot corticosteroid injections in patients with a history of corticosteroid-induced intraocular pressure elevation

Darrin S. Levin, Dennis P. Han, Sundeep Dev, William J. Wirostko, William F. Mieler, Thomas B. Connor, Varghese George, Dan Eastwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Scopus citations

Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine whether a history of intraocular pressure elevation from local corticosteroid administration could predict subsequent intraocular pressure elevation after posterior subtenon's corticosteroid injection. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of 64 consecutive patients (64 eyes) receiving posterior subtenon's corticosteroid injection. Patients were categorized as either historical corticosteroid responders or nonresponders based on intraocular pressure response to topical corticosteroid drops in the same eye or to previous posterior subtenon's corticosteroid injection of the fellow eye. Historical responders were defined as having a relative intraocular pressure increase of 5 mm Hg and absolute intraocular pressure greater than 24 mm Hg with an anatomically open angle. Relative risk of intraocular pressure elevation was evaluated based on historical response and presenting diagnosis. RESULTS: Nine eyes were historical responders, and 55 eyes were historical nonresponders. A higher rate of recurrent intraocular pressure elevation developed in historical responder eyes (4 of 9, 44%) compared with nonresponders (7 of 55, 13%) after posterior subtenon's injection (P = .04, Fisher's test; P = .07, Kaplan-Meier analysis). Historical responders with uveitis were at significantly higher risk of intraocular pressure elevation than nonresponders without uveitis (hazard ratio = 10.8, P = .04, Cox proportional hazards). All but one eye that developed intraocular pressure elevation from posterior subtenon's injection was adequately controlled with topical antiglaucoma therapy. CONCLUSION: In nonglaucomatous eyes, a previous history of corticosteroid-induced intraocular pressure elevation is a relative, not absolute, contraindication to posterior subtenon's corticosteroid injection, because the risk of intraocular pressure elevation is not absolute, and because it can usually be well controlled with topical antiglaucoma therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)196-202
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume133
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 29 2002
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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