Sucking and Breathing Patterns During Breast- and Bottle-feeding in Term Neonates: Effects of Nutrient Delivery and Composition

Oommen P. Mathew, Jatinder Bhatia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Scopus citations

Abstract

We attempted to determine whether differences in milk composition or flow rate are the primary determinants in altering breathing pattern during nipple-feeding. In the first phase of the study, 15 neonates were studied during breast-feeding and bottle-feeding; in the second phase, 15 were evaluated during bottle-feeding of expressed human milk and formula. A reduction in inspiratory duration was observed with all feeding regimens. Moreover, significant prolongation in expiratory duration and reduction in breathing frequency were observed during bottle-feeding of formula and expressed human milk (compared with control); these effects were greater with formula feeding. Higher sucking frequency was observed during breast-feeding compared with bottle-feeding; no difference in sucking frequency or sucking pressure was observed between bottle-feeding of expressed human milk and formula. We conclude that most of the differences in sucking and breathing patterns between breast- and bottle-feeding can be attributed to nutrient delivery rather than nutrient composition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)588-592
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Diseases of Children
Volume143
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1989
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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