Survey of behavior management teaching in pediatric dentistry advanced education programs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to survey pediatric dentistry advanced education program directors regarding the teaching of behavior management techniques. Methods: Surveys were mailed to all (65) advanced education programs in the United States. Follow-up mailings were sent to nonrespondents. The survey contained items on program demographics and the program's teaching of communicative and pharmacologic techniques. Information was also obtained on informed consent and parental presence in the operatory. Results: Surveys were returned by 54 programs. Two programs declined to respond because they had not yet accepted or certified residents. The final response rate was 86%. The mean percentage (± SD) of total didactic time devoted to behavior management was 13% (±9.5). Communicative techniques were taught as "acceptable" by 98% of programs, with the exception of the hand-over-mouth exercise (HOME), which was taught as "unacceptable" by 54% of programs. Active and passive immobilization of sedated and nonsedated children was taught as "acceptable" by 76% to 98% of programs. All programs taught that pharmacologic techniques (nitrous oxide, conscious sedation, general anesthesia) are "acceptable." There was little evidence that the teaching of behavior management techniques had changed over the previous 5 years, nor that it is likely to change in the near future. Parental presence in the operatory was common for some procedures, particularly among younger children. Conclusions: Most programs do not teach HOME as an acceptable behavior management technique. The amount of curricular time devoted to behavior management is not likely to change appreciably in the near future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-158
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Dentistry
Volume26
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1 2004

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Pediatric Dentistry
Teaching
Education
Mouth
Hand
Exercise
Conscious Sedation
Nitrous Oxide
Informed Consent
Immobilization
General Anesthesia
Demography
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Advanced education
  • Behavior management
  • Dental education
  • Pediatric dentistry
  • Survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Survey of behavior management teaching in pediatric dentistry advanced education programs. / Adair, Steven M.; Rockman, Roy Allan; Schafer, Tara E; Waller, Jennifer L.

In: Pediatric Dentistry, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.03.2004, p. 151-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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