TEAD1 protects against necroptosis in postmitotic cardiomyocytes through regulation of nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial genes

Jinhua Liu, Tong Wen, Kunzhe Dong, Xiangqin He, Hongyi Zhou, Jian Shen, Zurong Fu, Guoqing Hu, Wenxia Ma, Jie Li, Wenjuan Wang, Liang Wang, Brynn N. Akerberg, Jiqian Xu, Islam Osman, Zeqi Zheng, Wang Wang, Quansheng Du, William T. Pu, Meixiang XiangWeiqin Chen, Huabo Su, Wei Zhang, Jiliang Zhou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Hippo signaling effector, TEAD1 plays an essential role in cardiovascular development. However, a role for TEAD1 in postmitotic cardiomyocytes (CMs) remains incompletely understood. Herein we reported that TEAD1 is required for postmitotic CM survival. We found that adult mice with ubiquitous or CM-specific loss of Tead1 present with a rapid lethality due to an acute-onset dilated cardiomyopathy. Surprisingly, deletion of Tead1 activated the necroptotic pathway and induced massive cardiomyocyte necroptosis, but not apoptosis. In contrast to apoptosis, necroptosis is a pro-inflammatory form of cell death and consistent with this, dramatically higher levels of markers of activated macrophages and pro-inflammatory cytokines were observed in the hearts of Tead1 knockout mice. Blocking necroptosis by administration of necrostatin-1 rescued Tead1 deletion-induced heart failure. Mechanistically, genome-wide transcriptome and ChIP-seq analysis revealed that in adult hearts, Tead1 directly activates a large set of nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial genes required for assembly of the electron transfer complex and the production of ATP. Loss of Tead1 expression in adult CMs increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, disrupted the structure of mitochondria, reduced complex I-IV driven oxygen consumption and ATP levels, resulting in the activation of necroptosis. This study identifies an unexpected paradigm in which TEAD1 is essential for postmitotic CM survival by maintaining the expression of nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial genes required for ATP synthesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2045-2059
Number of pages15
JournalCell Death and Differentiation
Volume28
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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