The geriatric gravida

Multifetal pregnancy reduction, donor eggs, and aggressive infertility treatments

M. I. Evans, Jr Hume, S. Polak, Y. Yaron, A. Drugan, Michael Peter Diamond, M. P. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Recent technologic advances and societal acceptance have dramatically increased the use of donor eggs for infertile couples who require assisted reproductive technologies. Now many 'older' couples can access assisted reproductive technologies to achieve pregnancies. We sought to evaluate me changing pattern of patients referred for multifetal pregnancy reduction as a result of donor eggs and age factors in aggressive infertility treatment. STUDY DESIGN: Patients undergoing multifetal pregnancy reduction from 1986 to 1996 were included and categorized by year groupings age, and the use of donor eggs. RESULTS: A total of 523 patients were referred for and underwent multifetal pregnancy reduction. Before 1994, only 4 of 226 (1.8%) had received donor eggs whereas in 1994 to 1996, 29 of 297 (9.8%) had received donor eggs (χ2 = 12.6, p < 0.001). Eight of 9 patients aged ≤45 years undergoing multifetal pregnancy reduction received donor eggs. There were no patients aged ≤45 years before 1994 but 9 in 1994 to 1096. Four of 9 patients aged ≤45 years with multifetal pregnancies chose reduction to singleton gestation. The proportions of patients aged ≤40 years have increased from 0% to 11% in the last 8 years. CONCLUSIONS: The availability of ocher eggs has dramatically increased the use of assisted reproductive technologies and subsequent use of multifetal pregnancy reduction in order patients. Older patients are more inclined to want reduction to singleton gestation; they cite parental demands, financial issues, and their ability to parent in their 60s and 70s as reasons for reduction to singleton gestation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)875-878
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume177
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Multifetal Pregnancy Reduction
Geriatrics
Infertility
Eggs
Tissue Donors
Assisted Reproductive Techniques
Pregnancy
Therapeutics
Age Factors

Keywords

  • Advanced maternal age
  • Assisted reproductive techniques
  • Donor eggs
  • Multifetal pregnancy reduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

The geriatric gravida : Multifetal pregnancy reduction, donor eggs, and aggressive infertility treatments. / Evans, M. I.; Hume, Jr; Polak, S.; Yaron, Y.; Drugan, A.; Diamond, Michael Peter; Johnson, M. P.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 177, No. 4, 01.01.1997, p. 875-878.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Evans, M. I. ; Hume, Jr ; Polak, S. ; Yaron, Y. ; Drugan, A. ; Diamond, Michael Peter ; Johnson, M. P. / The geriatric gravida : Multifetal pregnancy reduction, donor eggs, and aggressive infertility treatments. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1997 ; Vol. 177, No. 4. pp. 875-878.
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