The relationship between physical activity and serum lipids and lipoproteins in black children and adolescents

Robert H. Durant, Charles W Linder, James W. Harkess, Richard G. Gray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study assesses the association between the serum lipid and lipoprotein levels of 62 black children and 37 black adolescents and their reported levels of habitual physical activity, 24-hour dietary intake, and physical measurements. In the children physical activity was not correlated with serum lipid and lipoprotein levels. Indicators of physical activity had a positive correlation (P < 0.02) with high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and negative correlations (P < 0.05) with the total serum cholesterol/high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol/high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol ratios in the adolescents. Subjects were stratified into "low activity" and "high activity" groups. High-activity subjects had lower (P < 0.05) total serum cholesterol/high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol/high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol ratios than less active subjects. Subjects that ran track had lower (P < 0.02) total serum cholesterol and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol than non-track participants. The results suggest that increased habitual physical activity may have a favorable effect on serum lipid and lipoprotein levels in black adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-60
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health Care
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

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Lipoproteins
HDL Cholesterol
Exercise
Lipids
Serum
LDL Cholesterol
Cholesterol

Keywords

  • Activity, physical
  • Cholesterol
  • Lipoproteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The relationship between physical activity and serum lipids and lipoproteins in black children and adolescents. / Durant, Robert H.; Linder, Charles W; Harkess, James W.; Gray, Richard G.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health Care, Vol. 4, No. 1, 01.01.1983, p. 55-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Durant, Robert H. ; Linder, Charles W ; Harkess, James W. ; Gray, Richard G. / The relationship between physical activity and serum lipids and lipoproteins in black children and adolescents. In: Journal of Adolescent Health Care. 1983 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 55-60.
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