The Relative Citation Ratio: Examining a Novel Measure of Research Productivity among Southern Academic Ophthalmologists

Parth A. Patel, Kajol K. Patel, Rhea Gopali, Anvith Reddy, David Bogorad, Kathryn Bollinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose To analyze research productivity, as assessed by the National Institutes of Health-supported relative citation ratio (RCR), for a cohort of Southern academic ophthalmologists. Design A descriptive and cross-sectional design was used. Data on gender, academic rank (assigned as an assistant professor, associate professor, professor, or “other”), degrees, and career duration were collected using online resources. Research yield was quantified using mean and weighted RCR data queried from the iCite database. Significant between-group differences were calculated using the Mann–Whitney U-test and the Kruskal–Wallis test. Settings Practicing academic ophthalmologists at Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited ophthalmology programs in the Southern United States (n = 1018). Results For all Southern academic ophthalmologists, median mean RCR was 0.90 (IQR 0.18–1.71) and median weighted RCR was 5.12 (IQR 0.34–33.18). Advanced academic rank and PhD acquisition were significantly associated with increased mean and weighted RCR. After exclusion of faculty within the “other” category, median mean RCR was 1.12 (IQR 0.54–1.80) and median weighted RCR was 11.65 (IQR 2.03–45.58). Furthermore, effects of career duration and gender emerged. Ophthalmologists with longer careers had significantly higher mean and weighted RCR than their younger counterparts. Males had significantly higher mean and weighted RCR than females. Conclusions Academic rank and attainment of a PhD degree were correlated with increased research productivity. When analyses focused exclusively on faculty not in the “other” subgroup, male gender, and lengthier career were associated with increased mean and weighted RCR, the former of which potentially highlights differences in professional advancement between genders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSeminars in Ophthalmology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bibliometrics
  • H-index
  • National Institutes of Health
  • Relative Citation Ratio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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