The Toxicity of Ozone to the Bluegill

Michael H Paller, Roy C. Heidinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ozone toxicity to bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) was determined using standard bioassay procedures. In initial work bluegill were exposed to water containing ozone for 24 h; the Lc50 was 0.06 ppm. A second experiment simulated “shock defouling” — the periodic dosing of power plant cooling water with high biocide concentrations to prevent biofouling. The Lc50 for a series of six 30-min exposure periods spaced 8 h apart was 0.32 ppm. A third experiment attempting to determine the effects of sublethal concentrations resulted in the death of 9 of 15 bluegill after 4 weeks of exposure to 0.01 ppm of ozone. No controls died in any experiment. It was concluded that ozone is highly toxic to bluegill. Safe limits for long-term exposure probably lie well below 0.01 ppm. The results of this study and an examination of the literature indicate that ozone is more toxic than chlorine; however ozone is readily removed from treated water while some chlorine compounds are not.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)169-193
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Environmental Science and Engineering
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1979
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ozone
Toxicity
Biofouling
Biocides
Bioassay
Experiments
Cooling water
Chlorine compounds
Chlorine
Water
Power plants

Keywords

  • Bluegill
  • Ozone Toxicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution

Cite this

The Toxicity of Ozone to the Bluegill. / Paller, Michael H; Heidinger, Roy C.

In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Environmental Science and Engineering, Vol. 14, No. 3, 01.01.1979, p. 169-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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