Transition of mesothelial cell to fibroblast in peritoneal dialysis

EMT, stem cell or bystander?

Yu Liu, Zheng Dong, Hong Liu, Jiefu Zhu, Fuyou Liu, Guochun Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD) can lead to fibrotic changes in the peritoneum, characterized by loss of mesothelial cells (MCs) and thickening of the submesothelial area with an accumulation of collagen and myofibroblasts. The origin of myofibroblasts is a central question in peritoneal fibrosis that remains unanswered at present. Numerous clinical and experimental studies have suggested that MCs, through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), contribute to the pool of peritoneal myofibroblasts. However, recent work has placed significant doubts on the paradigm of EMT in organ fibrogenesis (in the kidney particularly), highlighting the need to reconsider the role of EMT in the generation of myofibroblasts in peritoneal fibrosis. In particular, selective cell isolation and lineage-tracing experiments have suggested the existence of progenitor cells in the peritoneum, which are able to switch to fibroblast-like cells when stimulated by the local environment. These findings highlight the plastic nature of MCs and its contribution to peritoneal fibrogenesis. In this review, we summarize the key findings and caveats of EMT in organ fibrogenesis, with a focus on PD-related peritoneal fibrosis, and discuss the potential of peritoneal MCs as a source of myofibroblasts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14-25
Number of pages12
JournalPeritoneal Dialysis International
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition
Myofibroblasts
Peritoneal Dialysis
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Peritoneal Fibrosis
Fibroblasts
Peritoneum
Cell Separation
Cell Lineage
Plastics
Collagen
Stem Cells
Kidney

Keywords

  • Epithelial-mesenchymal transition
  • Fibrosis
  • Mesothelial cell
  • Peritoneal dialysis
  • Progenitor cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Transition of mesothelial cell to fibroblast in peritoneal dialysis : EMT, stem cell or bystander? / Liu, Yu; Dong, Zheng; Liu, Hong; Zhu, Jiefu; Liu, Fuyou; Chen, Guochun.

In: Peritoneal Dialysis International, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 14-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Liu, Yu ; Dong, Zheng ; Liu, Hong ; Zhu, Jiefu ; Liu, Fuyou ; Chen, Guochun. / Transition of mesothelial cell to fibroblast in peritoneal dialysis : EMT, stem cell or bystander?. In: Peritoneal Dialysis International. 2015 ; Vol. 35, No. 1. pp. 14-25.
@article{0636a2fe8a614dfa8e88739e059ea750,
title = "Transition of mesothelial cell to fibroblast in peritoneal dialysis: EMT, stem cell or bystander?",
abstract = "Long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD) can lead to fibrotic changes in the peritoneum, characterized by loss of mesothelial cells (MCs) and thickening of the submesothelial area with an accumulation of collagen and myofibroblasts. The origin of myofibroblasts is a central question in peritoneal fibrosis that remains unanswered at present. Numerous clinical and experimental studies have suggested that MCs, through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), contribute to the pool of peritoneal myofibroblasts. However, recent work has placed significant doubts on the paradigm of EMT in organ fibrogenesis (in the kidney particularly), highlighting the need to reconsider the role of EMT in the generation of myofibroblasts in peritoneal fibrosis. In particular, selective cell isolation and lineage-tracing experiments have suggested the existence of progenitor cells in the peritoneum, which are able to switch to fibroblast-like cells when stimulated by the local environment. These findings highlight the plastic nature of MCs and its contribution to peritoneal fibrogenesis. In this review, we summarize the key findings and caveats of EMT in organ fibrogenesis, with a focus on PD-related peritoneal fibrosis, and discuss the potential of peritoneal MCs as a source of myofibroblasts.",
keywords = "Epithelial-mesenchymal transition, Fibrosis, Mesothelial cell, Peritoneal dialysis, Progenitor cell",
author = "Yu Liu and Zheng Dong and Hong Liu and Jiefu Zhu and Fuyou Liu and Guochun Chen",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3747/pdi.2014.00188",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "35",
pages = "14--25",
journal = "Peritoneal Dialysis International",
issn = "0896-8608",
publisher = "Multimed Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Transition of mesothelial cell to fibroblast in peritoneal dialysis

T2 - EMT, stem cell or bystander?

AU - Liu, Yu

AU - Dong, Zheng

AU - Liu, Hong

AU - Zhu, Jiefu

AU - Liu, Fuyou

AU - Chen, Guochun

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD) can lead to fibrotic changes in the peritoneum, characterized by loss of mesothelial cells (MCs) and thickening of the submesothelial area with an accumulation of collagen and myofibroblasts. The origin of myofibroblasts is a central question in peritoneal fibrosis that remains unanswered at present. Numerous clinical and experimental studies have suggested that MCs, through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), contribute to the pool of peritoneal myofibroblasts. However, recent work has placed significant doubts on the paradigm of EMT in organ fibrogenesis (in the kidney particularly), highlighting the need to reconsider the role of EMT in the generation of myofibroblasts in peritoneal fibrosis. In particular, selective cell isolation and lineage-tracing experiments have suggested the existence of progenitor cells in the peritoneum, which are able to switch to fibroblast-like cells when stimulated by the local environment. These findings highlight the plastic nature of MCs and its contribution to peritoneal fibrogenesis. In this review, we summarize the key findings and caveats of EMT in organ fibrogenesis, with a focus on PD-related peritoneal fibrosis, and discuss the potential of peritoneal MCs as a source of myofibroblasts.

AB - Long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD) can lead to fibrotic changes in the peritoneum, characterized by loss of mesothelial cells (MCs) and thickening of the submesothelial area with an accumulation of collagen and myofibroblasts. The origin of myofibroblasts is a central question in peritoneal fibrosis that remains unanswered at present. Numerous clinical and experimental studies have suggested that MCs, through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), contribute to the pool of peritoneal myofibroblasts. However, recent work has placed significant doubts on the paradigm of EMT in organ fibrogenesis (in the kidney particularly), highlighting the need to reconsider the role of EMT in the generation of myofibroblasts in peritoneal fibrosis. In particular, selective cell isolation and lineage-tracing experiments have suggested the existence of progenitor cells in the peritoneum, which are able to switch to fibroblast-like cells when stimulated by the local environment. These findings highlight the plastic nature of MCs and its contribution to peritoneal fibrogenesis. In this review, we summarize the key findings and caveats of EMT in organ fibrogenesis, with a focus on PD-related peritoneal fibrosis, and discuss the potential of peritoneal MCs as a source of myofibroblasts.

KW - Epithelial-mesenchymal transition

KW - Fibrosis

KW - Mesothelial cell

KW - Peritoneal dialysis

KW - Progenitor cell

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84930888973&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84930888973&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3747/pdi.2014.00188

DO - 10.3747/pdi.2014.00188

M3 - Review article

VL - 35

SP - 14

EP - 25

JO - Peritoneal Dialysis International

JF - Peritoneal Dialysis International

SN - 0896-8608

IS - 1

ER -