Turnover of first-time chairs in departments of psychiatry

Peter F. Buckley, William F. Rayburn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The authors examine the tenure of first-time Chairs in academic departments of psychiatry in order to stimulate discussion on extant workforce and eadership issues. Method: Data on tenure of Chairs in psychiatry and other nonsurgical specialties were derived from the longitudinal database of the Association of American Medical Colleges andevaluated for successive 4-year epochs between 1983 and 2002. Results: The 5-year retention rate of Chairs of academic departments of psychiatry is 68%, and the 10-year retention rate drops sharply to 39%, similar to other specialties. Conclusion: Although most first-time Chairs of psychiatry last 5 years in their position, much fewer remain 10 years or longer. Therefore, efforts to promote succession planning for academic leadership in psychiatry are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)126-128
Number of pages3
JournalAcademic Psychiatry
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011

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  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Turnover of first-time chairs in departments of psychiatry. / Buckley, Peter F.; Rayburn, William F.

In: Academic Psychiatry, Vol. 35, No. 2, 01.03.2011, p. 126-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Buckley, Peter F. ; Rayburn, William F. / Turnover of first-time chairs in departments of psychiatry. In: Academic Psychiatry. 2011 ; Vol. 35, No. 2. pp. 126-128.
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