Ultrastructural investigations of the bone and fibrous connective tissue interface with endosteal dental implants

D. E. Steflik, R. V. McKinney, A. L. Sisk, D. L. Koth, B. B. Singh, Gregory R Parr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The interface between the tissues of the oral cavity and ceramic and titanium cylindrical endosteal dental implants was investigated with correlated light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. This study suggested that mandibular bone can directly interface and form an intimate association with one-stage endosteal dental implants. This potential attachment matrix is composed of a composite of calcified bone, and an osteoid unmineralized matrix in association with an apparent osteogenic connective tissue. Further, results from this study suggested that at a level inferior to the junctional epithelium, and superior to the level of crestal bone, fibrous connective tissue can attach to the dental implant. This non-loadbearing attachment of gingival connective tissue could, by contact inhibition, prevent apical epithelial migration. In association with previously documented epithelial attachment, such apical support and connective tissue attachment appears to suggest that endosteal dental implants can be adequately maintained in the oral cavity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1039-1048
Number of pages10
JournalScanning Microscopy
Volume4
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 1990

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connective tissue
Dental prostheses
bones
attachment
Bone
Tissue
cavities
epithelium
matrices
titanium
Optical microscopy
ceramics
microscopy
Titanium
transmission electron microscopy
scanning electron microscopy
composite materials
Transmission electron microscopy
Scanning electron microscopy
Composite materials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Instrumentation

Cite this

Steflik, D. E., McKinney, R. V., Sisk, A. L., Koth, D. L., Singh, B. B., & Parr, G. R. (1990). Ultrastructural investigations of the bone and fibrous connective tissue interface with endosteal dental implants. Scanning Microscopy, 4(4), 1039-1048.

Ultrastructural investigations of the bone and fibrous connective tissue interface with endosteal dental implants. / Steflik, D. E.; McKinney, R. V.; Sisk, A. L.; Koth, D. L.; Singh, B. B.; Parr, Gregory R.

In: Scanning Microscopy, Vol. 4, No. 4, 01.12.1990, p. 1039-1048.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Steflik, DE, McKinney, RV, Sisk, AL, Koth, DL, Singh, BB & Parr, GR 1990, 'Ultrastructural investigations of the bone and fibrous connective tissue interface with endosteal dental implants', Scanning Microscopy, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 1039-1048.
Steflik, D. E. ; McKinney, R. V. ; Sisk, A. L. ; Koth, D. L. ; Singh, B. B. ; Parr, Gregory R. / Ultrastructural investigations of the bone and fibrous connective tissue interface with endosteal dental implants. In: Scanning Microscopy. 1990 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 1039-1048.
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