Use of a clinical MR scanner for imaging the rat brain

Donald A. Smith, Laurence P. Clarke, Jeffrey A. Fiedler, F. Reed Murtagh, Eugene A. Bonaroti, Gregory John Sengstock, Gary W. Arendash

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are established techniques that enable noninvasive anatomic and functional tissue characterization in vivo. These tools have been employed to probe experimental models of neoplasia, cerebrovascular disease, brain injury, and neurotransplantation in small animals. To date, these studies have been executed primarily on research-dedicated instruments of limited availability or resolution. Using relatively straightforward software and hardware modifications of a widely used clinical MRI unit, we were able to image numerous structures within the living rat brain including the neostriatum, hippocampus, periaqueductal gray, and the ventricular system. Illustrative applications of this imaging technique in two intracerebral infusion models involving rats are presented. Such adaptation of clinical MRI scanners has the potential to significantly expand the availability of high resolution in vivo imaging of small animals for a variety of experimental protocols.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-120
Number of pages6
JournalBrain Research Bulletin
Volume31
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

Fingerprint

Neuroimaging
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Neostriatum
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Periaqueductal Gray
Brain Injuries
Hippocampus
Theoretical Models
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Software
Brain
Research
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Clinical scanner
  • Head coil
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Rat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Smith, D. A., Clarke, L. P., Fiedler, J. A., Murtagh, F. R., Bonaroti, E. A., Sengstock, G. J., & Arendash, G. W. (1993). Use of a clinical MR scanner for imaging the rat brain. Brain Research Bulletin, 31(1-2), 115-120. https://doi.org/10.1016/0361-9230(93)90017-6

Use of a clinical MR scanner for imaging the rat brain. / Smith, Donald A.; Clarke, Laurence P.; Fiedler, Jeffrey A.; Murtagh, F. Reed; Bonaroti, Eugene A.; Sengstock, Gregory John; Arendash, Gary W.

In: Brain Research Bulletin, Vol. 31, No. 1-2, 01.01.1993, p. 115-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, DA, Clarke, LP, Fiedler, JA, Murtagh, FR, Bonaroti, EA, Sengstock, GJ & Arendash, GW 1993, 'Use of a clinical MR scanner for imaging the rat brain', Brain Research Bulletin, vol. 31, no. 1-2, pp. 115-120. https://doi.org/10.1016/0361-9230(93)90017-6
Smith DA, Clarke LP, Fiedler JA, Murtagh FR, Bonaroti EA, Sengstock GJ et al. Use of a clinical MR scanner for imaging the rat brain. Brain Research Bulletin. 1993 Jan 1;31(1-2):115-120. https://doi.org/10.1016/0361-9230(93)90017-6
Smith, Donald A. ; Clarke, Laurence P. ; Fiedler, Jeffrey A. ; Murtagh, F. Reed ; Bonaroti, Eugene A. ; Sengstock, Gregory John ; Arendash, Gary W. / Use of a clinical MR scanner for imaging the rat brain. In: Brain Research Bulletin. 1993 ; Vol. 31, No. 1-2. pp. 115-120.
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