Use of urinary cotinine and questionnaires in the evaluation of infant exposure to tobacco smoke in epidemiologic studies

Edward L. Peterson, Christine C. Johnson, Dennis Randall Ownby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke is an important variable in many pediatric epidemiologic studies. We measured urinary cotinine, a specific metabolite of nicotine, in a population based cohort of children every other month from birth through two years of age. Extensive data regarding exposure to smokers (people in the home, in home and away from home day care, home visitors, visits to smokers) were collected monthly by way of home interviews. We evaluated, with multiple cotinine measurements as the gold standard, other measures of exposure that are more feasible to obtain in large scale studies. Comparing one cotinine to the average of multiple measurements, we found that 33.7% were in error in excess of 100 ng/mg, but 84% of the infants could be correctly classified into categories of low versus high. Parental smoking patterns had the highest predictive accuracy (fathers 67.0% and mothers 64.1%). Combining selected smoker categories (either parent, other home residents, outside day care workers) resulted in improved accuracy of 79.3%.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)917-923
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume50
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cotinine
Smoke
Tobacco
Epidemiologic Studies
House Calls
Environmental Exposure
Home Care Services
Nicotine
Fathers
Smoking
Mothers
Parturition
Interviews
Pediatrics
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Children
  • Cotinine
  • Environmental tobacco smoke exposure
  • Questionnaire
  • Reliability
  • Validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Use of urinary cotinine and questionnaires in the evaluation of infant exposure to tobacco smoke in epidemiologic studies. / Peterson, Edward L.; Johnson, Christine C.; Ownby, Dennis Randall.

In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 50, No. 8, 01.08.1997, p. 917-923.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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