Use of Y DNA probes to identify children at risk for dysgenetic gonadal tumors

S. P.T. Tho, P. G. McDonough

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The occurrence of gonadal neoplasia in phenotypic females harboring dysgenetic gonads and Y chromosome material is well known. The precise determinants for oncogenesis in these subjects remain enigmatic. Assuming that the Y chromosome is the culprit, it is not possible at this time to identify the portion of the Y which predisposes to malignancy. Diligent search for Y chromosome material is mandatory in this group of patients with gonadal dysgenesis. However, the clinician is confronted with two dilemmas: 1) a minority population of cells with a Y chromosome in a putative 45X monosomic could remain undetectable despite careful and repeated cytogenetic examinations of various tissues, and 2) a minute chromosomal fragment suspected to be Y may remain unidentifiable with current cytogenetic techniques. Application of modern molecular biology to clinical medicine has opened new avenues to resolve these dilemmas. The purpose of this article is : 1) to reexamine the spectrum of Y aneuploidy leading to gonadal dysgenesis, tumor formation, and the inherent clinical dilemmas; 2) to review the molecular biology of the Y chromosome and the Y-specific DNA probes; and 3) to prove that these Y probes may serve as powerful tools for the resolution of the clinical dilemmas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)671-681
Number of pages11
JournalClinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

Fingerprint

Y Chromosome
DNA Probes
Gonadal Dysgenesis
Neoplasms
Molecular Biology
Cytogenetic Analysis
Clinical Medicine
Gonads
Aneuploidy
Cytogenetics
Carcinogenesis
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Use of Y DNA probes to identify children at risk for dysgenetic gonadal tumors. / Tho, S. P.T.; McDonough, P. G.

In: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 30, No. 3, 01.01.1987, p. 671-681.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Tho, S. P.T. ; McDonough, P. G. / Use of Y DNA probes to identify children at risk for dysgenetic gonadal tumors. In: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1987 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 671-681.
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