Users' Guides to the Medical Literature: V. How to Use an Article About Prognosis

Andreas Laupacis, George Wells, W. Scott Richardson, Peter Tugwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

429 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

You are about to see a 76-year-old retired schoolteacher for the second time. You first saw her in the clinic a month ago because of cognitive problems. Your evaluation at that time included a Standardized Mini-Mental State Examination,1 on which she scored 18 out of a possible 30 points, and a physical examination that was normal including no focal neurological signs. You arranged investigations for the treatable causes of dementia that were negative, and you thus feel she has probable Alzheimer's disease. The patient has lived with her son since her husband died 6 years ago. Her son thinks that she first developed significant problems with her memory about 3 years ago. However, she has become increasingly agitated and paranoid during the last year. She has refused to allow him to look after her financial affairs, despite the fact that she owns three pieces of property and.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)234-237
Number of pages4
JournalJAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume272
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 20 1994

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Nuclear Family
Spouses
Physical Examination
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Users' Guides to the Medical Literature : V. How to Use an Article About Prognosis. / Laupacis, Andreas; Wells, George; Richardson, W. Scott; Tugwell, Peter.

In: JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 272, No. 3, 20.07.1994, p. 234-237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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