Using multiple-case studies to investigate relationships among knowledge management systems, business process and business performance

A task technology fit perspective

Jason Triche, Qing Cao, Mark Andrew Thompson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In the face of heighted competition, organizations need to continuously improve their competitive advantage. Both knowledge management (KM) and knowledge management systems (KMS) play a pivotal role in helping organizations to stay competitive. There is much research in KMS, however very little is known about how they affect individual and organizational performance. Drawing on task-technology fit theory (Goodhue and Thompson, 1995), this study explores the fit or alignment between business process (task) and KMS (technology) and its impact on KMS utilization based on multiple case studies. Subsequently, the impacts of both the task-technology fit and KMS utilization on individual and business performance are investigated. This paper contributes to the KM literature in several ways. First, it applies task-technology fit theory to an important context, that of KM. Second, it characterizes task as business processes which have the potential to help explain KMS success on business performance. Third, the paper explores the positive impact of task-technology fit on KMS utilization and business performance. Fourth, the study provides insight into the future development of KMS which are better aligned with managerial purposes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication18th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2012, AMCIS 2012
Pages1265-1272
Number of pages8
Volume2
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
Externally publishedYes
Event18th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2012, AMCIS 2012 - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: Aug 9 2012Aug 12 2012

Other

Other18th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2012, AMCIS 2012
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle, WA
Period8/9/128/12/12

Fingerprint

Knowledge management
knowledge management
performance
Industry
Computer systems
utilization

Keywords

  • Business performance
  • Business process
  • Knowledge management
  • Knowledge management systems
  • Task-technology fit

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Information Systems
  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

Using multiple-case studies to investigate relationships among knowledge management systems, business process and business performance : A task technology fit perspective. / Triche, Jason; Cao, Qing; Thompson, Mark Andrew.

18th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2012, AMCIS 2012. Vol. 2 2012. p. 1265-1272.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Triche, J, Cao, Q & Thompson, MA 2012, Using multiple-case studies to investigate relationships among knowledge management systems, business process and business performance: A task technology fit perspective. in 18th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2012, AMCIS 2012. vol. 2, pp. 1265-1272, 18th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2012, AMCIS 2012, Seattle, WA, United States, 8/9/12.
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