Validation of the 2015 prostate cancer grade groups for predicting long-term oncologic outcomes in a shared equal-access health system

Ariel A. Schulman, Lauren E. Howard, Kae Jack Tay, Efrat Tsivian, Christina Sze, Christopher L. Amling, William J. Aronson, Matthew R. Cooperberg, Christopher J. Kane, Martha Kennedy Terris, Stephen J. Freedland, Thomas J. Polascik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: A 5-tier prognostic grade group (GG) system was enacted to simplify the risk stratification of patients with prostate cancer in which Gleason scores of ≤6, 3 + 4, 4 + 3, 8, and 9 or 10 are considered GG 1 through 5, respectively. The authors investigated the utility of biopsy GG for predicting long-term oncologic outcomes after radical prostatectomy in an equal-access health system. METHODS: Men who underwent prostatectomy at 1 of 6 Veterans Affairs hospitals in the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database between 2005 and 2015 were reviewed. The prognostic ability of biopsy GG was examined using Cox models. Interactions between GG and race also were tested. RESULTS: In total, 2509 men were identified who had data available on biopsy Gleason scores, covariates, and follow-up. The cohort included men with GG 1 (909 patients; 36.2%), GG 2 (813 patients; 32.4%), GG 3 (398 patients; 15.9%), GG 4 (279 patients; 11.1%), and GG 5 (110 patients; 4.4%) prostate cancer. The cohort included 1002 African American men (41%). The median follow-up was 60 months (interquartile range, 33-90 months). Higher GG was associated with higher clinical stage, older age, more recent surgery, and surgical center (P <.001) as well as increased biochemical recurrence, secondary therapy, castration-resistant prostate cancer, metastases, and prostate cancer-specific mortality (all P <.001). There were no significant interactions with race in predicting measured outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The 5-tier GG system predicted multiple long-term endpoints after radical prostatectomy in an equal-access health system. The predictive value was consistent across races. Cancer 2017;123:4122–4129.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4122-4129
Number of pages8
JournalCancer
Volume123
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Prostatic Neoplasms
Health
Prostatectomy
Neoplasm Grading
Biopsy
Veterans Hospitals
Cancer Care Facilities
Castration
Proportional Hazards Models
African Americans
Databases
Neoplasm Metastasis
Recurrence
Mortality
Neoplasms
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Gleason grade
  • Shared Equal Access Research (SEARCH)
  • prostate cancer
  • race
  • radical prostatectomy
  • survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Schulman, A. A., Howard, L. E., Tay, K. J., Tsivian, E., Sze, C., Amling, C. L., ... Polascik, T. J. (2017). Validation of the 2015 prostate cancer grade groups for predicting long-term oncologic outcomes in a shared equal-access health system. Cancer, 123(21), 4122-4129. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.30844

Validation of the 2015 prostate cancer grade groups for predicting long-term oncologic outcomes in a shared equal-access health system. / Schulman, Ariel A.; Howard, Lauren E.; Tay, Kae Jack; Tsivian, Efrat; Sze, Christina; Amling, Christopher L.; Aronson, William J.; Cooperberg, Matthew R.; Kane, Christopher J.; Terris, Martha Kennedy; Freedland, Stephen J.; Polascik, Thomas J.

In: Cancer, Vol. 123, No. 21, 01.11.2017, p. 4122-4129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schulman, AA, Howard, LE, Tay, KJ, Tsivian, E, Sze, C, Amling, CL, Aronson, WJ, Cooperberg, MR, Kane, CJ, Terris, MK, Freedland, SJ & Polascik, TJ 2017, 'Validation of the 2015 prostate cancer grade groups for predicting long-term oncologic outcomes in a shared equal-access health system', Cancer, vol. 123, no. 21, pp. 4122-4129. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.30844
Schulman, Ariel A. ; Howard, Lauren E. ; Tay, Kae Jack ; Tsivian, Efrat ; Sze, Christina ; Amling, Christopher L. ; Aronson, William J. ; Cooperberg, Matthew R. ; Kane, Christopher J. ; Terris, Martha Kennedy ; Freedland, Stephen J. ; Polascik, Thomas J. / Validation of the 2015 prostate cancer grade groups for predicting long-term oncologic outcomes in a shared equal-access health system. In: Cancer. 2017 ; Vol. 123, No. 21. pp. 4122-4129.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: A 5-tier prognostic grade group (GG) system was enacted to simplify the risk stratification of patients with prostate cancer in which Gleason scores of ≤6, 3 + 4, 4 + 3, 8, and 9 or 10 are considered GG 1 through 5, respectively. The authors investigated the utility of biopsy GG for predicting long-term oncologic outcomes after radical prostatectomy in an equal-access health system. METHODS: Men who underwent prostatectomy at 1 of 6 Veterans Affairs hospitals in the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database between 2005 and 2015 were reviewed. The prognostic ability of biopsy GG was examined using Cox models. Interactions between GG and race also were tested. RESULTS: In total, 2509 men were identified who had data available on biopsy Gleason scores, covariates, and follow-up. The cohort included men with GG 1 (909 patients; 36.2{\%}), GG 2 (813 patients; 32.4{\%}), GG 3 (398 patients; 15.9{\%}), GG 4 (279 patients; 11.1{\%}), and GG 5 (110 patients; 4.4{\%}) prostate cancer. The cohort included 1002 African American men (41{\%}). The median follow-up was 60 months (interquartile range, 33-90 months). Higher GG was associated with higher clinical stage, older age, more recent surgery, and surgical center (P <.001) as well as increased biochemical recurrence, secondary therapy, castration-resistant prostate cancer, metastases, and prostate cancer-specific mortality (all P <.001). There were no significant interactions with race in predicting measured outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The 5-tier GG system predicted multiple long-term endpoints after radical prostatectomy in an equal-access health system. The predictive value was consistent across races. Cancer 2017;123:4122–4129.",
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AU - Sze, Christina

AU - Amling, Christopher L.

AU - Aronson, William J.

AU - Cooperberg, Matthew R.

AU - Kane, Christopher J.

AU - Terris, Martha Kennedy

AU - Freedland, Stephen J.

AU - Polascik, Thomas J.

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N2 - BACKGROUND: A 5-tier prognostic grade group (GG) system was enacted to simplify the risk stratification of patients with prostate cancer in which Gleason scores of ≤6, 3 + 4, 4 + 3, 8, and 9 or 10 are considered GG 1 through 5, respectively. The authors investigated the utility of biopsy GG for predicting long-term oncologic outcomes after radical prostatectomy in an equal-access health system. METHODS: Men who underwent prostatectomy at 1 of 6 Veterans Affairs hospitals in the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database between 2005 and 2015 were reviewed. The prognostic ability of biopsy GG was examined using Cox models. Interactions between GG and race also were tested. RESULTS: In total, 2509 men were identified who had data available on biopsy Gleason scores, covariates, and follow-up. The cohort included men with GG 1 (909 patients; 36.2%), GG 2 (813 patients; 32.4%), GG 3 (398 patients; 15.9%), GG 4 (279 patients; 11.1%), and GG 5 (110 patients; 4.4%) prostate cancer. The cohort included 1002 African American men (41%). The median follow-up was 60 months (interquartile range, 33-90 months). Higher GG was associated with higher clinical stage, older age, more recent surgery, and surgical center (P <.001) as well as increased biochemical recurrence, secondary therapy, castration-resistant prostate cancer, metastases, and prostate cancer-specific mortality (all P <.001). There were no significant interactions with race in predicting measured outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The 5-tier GG system predicted multiple long-term endpoints after radical prostatectomy in an equal-access health system. The predictive value was consistent across races. Cancer 2017;123:4122–4129.

AB - BACKGROUND: A 5-tier prognostic grade group (GG) system was enacted to simplify the risk stratification of patients with prostate cancer in which Gleason scores of ≤6, 3 + 4, 4 + 3, 8, and 9 or 10 are considered GG 1 through 5, respectively. The authors investigated the utility of biopsy GG for predicting long-term oncologic outcomes after radical prostatectomy in an equal-access health system. METHODS: Men who underwent prostatectomy at 1 of 6 Veterans Affairs hospitals in the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database between 2005 and 2015 were reviewed. The prognostic ability of biopsy GG was examined using Cox models. Interactions between GG and race also were tested. RESULTS: In total, 2509 men were identified who had data available on biopsy Gleason scores, covariates, and follow-up. The cohort included men with GG 1 (909 patients; 36.2%), GG 2 (813 patients; 32.4%), GG 3 (398 patients; 15.9%), GG 4 (279 patients; 11.1%), and GG 5 (110 patients; 4.4%) prostate cancer. The cohort included 1002 African American men (41%). The median follow-up was 60 months (interquartile range, 33-90 months). Higher GG was associated with higher clinical stage, older age, more recent surgery, and surgical center (P <.001) as well as increased biochemical recurrence, secondary therapy, castration-resistant prostate cancer, metastases, and prostate cancer-specific mortality (all P <.001). There were no significant interactions with race in predicting measured outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The 5-tier GG system predicted multiple long-term endpoints after radical prostatectomy in an equal-access health system. The predictive value was consistent across races. Cancer 2017;123:4122–4129.

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