Vascular consequences of a high-fat meal in physically active and inactive adults

Blair D. Johnson, Jaume Padilla, Ryan A. Harris, Janet P. Wallace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Habitually active adults (ACT) typically exhibit lower postprandial lipemia, a condition that may attenuate oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction following a high-fat meal (HFM), compared with inactive adults (INA). Our objective was to compare triglycerides (TAG), superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), oxidative stress (thiobarbituric reactive substances; TBARS), and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD%) before and after an HFM challenge in ACT and INA. ACT (n = 7) and INA (n = 7) subjects were matched for body mass index, age, and sex. Plasma TAG, SOD, TBARS, and FMD% were measured at baseline and 4 h after an HFM challenge. TAG significantly increased following the HFM in INA (4.15 ± 3.79 mmol·L-1 vs. 8.07 ± 5.12 mmol·L-1) and in ACT (2.16 ± 0.55 mmol·L-1 vs. 3.24 ± 1.40 mmol·L-1). Baseline TBARS were greater in ACT and remained unchanged in response to the HFM in both INA (5.1 ± 2.7 mmol·L-1 vs. 6.9 ± 2.9 mmol·L-1) and ACT (8.6 ± 2.0 mmol·L-1 vs. 7.9 ± 1.9 mmol·L-1). ACT exhibited greater SOD than INA at baseline (8.6 ± 0.7 U·mL-1 vs. 7.8 ± 0.6 U·mL-1) and following the HFM (9.3 ± 1.2 U·mL-1 vs. 8.0 ± 0.7 U·mL-1). Postprandial FMD% was decreased in INA (9.1% ± 4.0% vs. 6.2% ± 3.4%), yet remained unchanged in ACT (7.9% ± 3.7% vs. 9.3% ± 3.2%). In conclusion, the differential responses following an HFM support the concept that habitual physical activity can attenuate the negative postprandial alterations that affect vascular health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)368-375
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

Fingerprint

Blood Vessels
Meals
Fats
Superoxide Dismutase
Dilatation
Oxidative Stress
Brachial Artery
Hyperlipidemias
Triglycerides
Body Mass Index
Health

Keywords

  • Flow-mediated dilation
  • Lipemia
  • Oxidative stress
  • Postprandial
  • Triglycerides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Vascular consequences of a high-fat meal in physically active and inactive adults. / Johnson, Blair D.; Padilla, Jaume; Harris, Ryan A.; Wallace, Janet P.

In: Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, Vol. 36, No. 3, 01.05.2011, p. 368-375.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnson, Blair D. ; Padilla, Jaume ; Harris, Ryan A. ; Wallace, Janet P. / Vascular consequences of a high-fat meal in physically active and inactive adults. In: Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism. 2011 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 368-375.
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