What predicts patients' expressed likelihood of choosing electroconvulsive therapy as a future treatment option?

Peter B. Rosenquist, Aaron Dunn, Stephen Rapp, Aline Gaba, W. Vaughn McCall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between stated intention to choose electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) as a future treatment option and measures of function and quality of life, mood, and cognition in the month after this therapy. Understanding the factors influencing patient choice of ECT is a source of insight into the interplay between measures of response and perceived value of this treatment to patients, lending perspective to patient-centered quality improvement efforts. METHOD: In a prospective sample of 77 depressed patients given ECT, we surveyed recipients at 1 month about their expressed likelihood of choosing ECT given a future episode and examined predictors of their responses. RESULTS: Thirty-four subjects were classified as "likely" to choose a course of ECT, whereas 33 patients were "unlikely." A model including Hamilton baseline and change scores as well as baseline scores in instrumental activities of daily living significantly predicted likeliness after controlling for age and sex (R = 0.34, P < 0.0001). Other quality-of-life variables and measures of change in cognition were not significant in the model. CONCLUSIONS: In our sample, choosing ECT as a future treatment option was more likely for those who were more depressed before treatment, had more impaired instrumental activities at the outset of treatment, and experienced a more robust improvement in depressive symptoms. This variance was not explained by treatment-associated improvements in quality of life, function, or deficits in cognitive status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-37
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of ECT
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2006

Fingerprint

Electroconvulsive Therapy
Quality of Life
Cognition
Therapeutics
Activities of Daily Living
Quality Improvement
Depression

Keywords

  • Activities of daily living
  • Attitudes
  • ECT
  • Electroconvulsive therapy
  • Quality of life
  • Satisfaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

What predicts patients' expressed likelihood of choosing electroconvulsive therapy as a future treatment option? / Rosenquist, Peter B.; Dunn, Aaron; Rapp, Stephen; Gaba, Aline; McCall, W. Vaughn.

In: Journal of ECT, Vol. 22, No. 1, 01.03.2006, p. 33-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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