Where do immigrants fare worse? Modeling workplace wage gap variation with longitudinal employer-employee data

Donald Tomaskovic-Devey, Martin Hällsten, Dustin Avent-Holt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors propose a strategy for observing and explaining workplace variance in categorically linked inequalities. Using Swedish economy-wide linked employer-employee panel data, the authors examine variation in workplace wageine qualities between native Swedes and non-Western immigrants. Consistent with relational inequality theory, the authors’ findings are that immigrant-native wage gaps vary dramatically across workplaces, even net of strong human capital controls. The authors also find that, net of observed and fixed-effect controls for individual traits, workplace immigrant-native wage gaps decline with increased workplace immigrant employment and managerial representation and increase when job segregation rises. These results are stronger in high-inequality workplaces and for white-collar employees: contexts in which one expects status-based claims on organizational resources, the central causal mechanism identified by relational inequality theory, to be stronger. The authors conclude that workplace variation in the non-Western immigrant-native wage gaps is contingent on organizational variation in the relative power of groups and the institutional context in which that power is exercised.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1095-1143
Number of pages49
JournalAmerican Journal of Sociology
Volume120
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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