Why must some schizophrenic patients be involuntarily committed? The role of insight

Joseph Patrick McEvoy, Paul S. Applebaum, L. Joy Apperson, Jeffrey L. Geller, Susan Freter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

116 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Twenty-four of 52 (46%) schizophrenic patients hospitalized because of acute psychotic episodes associated with preadmission medication noncompliance required involuntary commitment. Committed patients were rated as significantly more severely ill than voluntary patients and were significantly more likely to be transferred to extended treatment facilities after acute care. However, committed patients were significantly less likely than were voluntarily admitted patients to acknowledge that they were psychiatrically ill and in need of treatment, i.e., to demonstrate insight. Although psychopathology diminished significantly in both committed and voluntary patients over the course of hospitalization, only in voluntary patients did insight increase significantly. Over a 21 2 to 31 2 year follow-up, those patients who had been involuntarily committed at the index hospitalization were significantly more likely to require involuntary radmissions than were the initially voluntary patients. Inability to see the self as ill seems to be a persistent trait in some schizophrenic patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-17
Number of pages5
JournalComprehensive Psychiatry
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Hospitalization
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Medication Adherence
Psychopathology
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Why must some schizophrenic patients be involuntarily committed? The role of insight. / McEvoy, Joseph Patrick; Applebaum, Paul S.; Apperson, L. Joy; Geller, Jeffrey L.; Freter, Susan.

In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.01.1989, p. 13-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McEvoy, Joseph Patrick ; Applebaum, Paul S. ; Apperson, L. Joy ; Geller, Jeffrey L. ; Freter, Susan. / Why must some schizophrenic patients be involuntarily committed? The role of insight. In: Comprehensive Psychiatry. 1989 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 13-17.
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