Win a Husband and Win the War: Military Women in Film 1949-1954

Ruth McClelland-Nugent, Ruth E Nugent

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

At the beginning of the Korean War, Hollywood studios, as during World War II, began churning out a number of films promoting military service, including the women's branches of service. These films differ in a number of ways, however, from their World War II precedents. Rather than focusing on the sacrifice of women int he military, most of the films promote the theme of the military as a sort of finishing school, preparing women for a postwar domestic role. Military nurses, however, are portrayed as dedicated career professionals; their service involves not only physical danger, but also sacrificing marriage and family. Films analyzed include Flight Nurse, Battle Circus, Never Wave at a WAC, Skirts Ahoy, and Francis Joins the WACs.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings from the Center for the Study of the Korean War
PublisherGraceland University press
StatePublished - 2008
EventProceedings from the Center for the Study of the Korean War - Independence, Missouri
Duration: Jan 1 2007 → …

Conference

ConferenceProceedings from the Center for the Study of the Korean War
Period1/1/07 → …

Fingerprint

Husbands
Military
Second World War
Nurses
Danger
Skirt
Flight
Marriage
Korean War
Hollywood Studios
Military Service
Waves
Physical
Circus

Cite this

McClelland-Nugent, R., & Nugent, R. E. (2008). Win a Husband and Win the War: Military Women in Film 1949-1954. In Proceedings from the Center for the Study of the Korean War Graceland University press.

Win a Husband and Win the War: Military Women in Film 1949-1954. / McClelland-Nugent, Ruth; Nugent, Ruth E.

Proceedings from the Center for the Study of the Korean War. Graceland University press, 2008.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

McClelland-Nugent, R & Nugent, RE 2008, Win a Husband and Win the War: Military Women in Film 1949-1954. in Proceedings from the Center for the Study of the Korean War. Graceland University press, Proceedings from the Center for the Study of the Korean War, 1/1/07.
McClelland-Nugent R, Nugent RE. Win a Husband and Win the War: Military Women in Film 1949-1954. In Proceedings from the Center for the Study of the Korean War. Graceland University press. 2008
McClelland-Nugent, Ruth ; Nugent, Ruth E. / Win a Husband and Win the War: Military Women in Film 1949-1954. Proceedings from the Center for the Study of the Korean War. Graceland University press, 2008.
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